elephant ear

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elephant ear

[′el·ə·fənt ‚ir]
(aerospace engineering)
Thick metal plating that reinforces a missile's skin.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

elephant ear

elephant ear
i. A type of air intake with twin inlets, one on each side of the fuselage.
ii. A slang term for a thick plate on a missile's skin that reinforces a hatch or a hole.
iii. A slang term for an overhanging elevator.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
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It is often said that an African elephant's ears are shaped like Africa, while an Asian elephant's ears look like India.
Tulameen plant stand (bolding smaller elephant's ear), $52; bluecaribou.ca.
For drama in garden beds, it's tough to beat 'Black Magic' elephant's ear (Colocasia esculenta).
Place a 6-foot-tall 'Black Magic' elephant's ear in a bed or border, for instance, and you have a striking focal point.
He and audrey also holds on to the elephant's ears, which are one of their most sensitive areas.
Known as elephant's ears for the shape of its foliage, its thick green leaves are also tough like an elephant's hide.
WITH their large, leathery, oval leaves, it's easy to see why bergenias are called elephant's ears. They add mighty drama to any planting scheme.
[4.] Begin the elephant's ears. An African elephant's ears look like the shape of the continent of Africa.
BERGENIA, known as 'elephant's ears' because of its broad foliage, is a spring-flowering perennial that does well in any soil and situation, sun or shade.
According to him, the beak is so big that it has been found to rival an elephant's ears in helping to cool the animal down when the weather gets hot.
Following her apprehensively down the incline amid a stand of banana plants whose leaves flapped like elephant's ears in the wind, I found myself in the middle of a small tropical wood.