elephant ear


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elephant ear

[′el·ə·fənt ‚ir]
(aerospace engineering)
Thick metal plating that reinforces a missile's skin.

elephant ear

elephant ear
i. A type of air intake with twin inlets, one on each side of the fuselage.
ii. A slang term for a thick plate on a missile's skin that reinforces a hatch or a hole.
iii. A slang term for an overhanging elevator.
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The results of this study show that, among the evaluated species and despite the TF < 1, vetiver was the most efficient in the translocation of Pb, followed by elephant ear and 'embauba', at all evaluated concentrations.
For example, elephant ears can tolerate growing in standing water, so they grow out from the banks and shoot up their stems, which collect sediment close to the bank, narrowing the stream, and keep growing out farther unless you dredge them.
Mary Roy's Sterling garden blooms with the beauty and color of primroses, daffodils, tiger lilies, coneflowers and elephant ears, to name just a few.
You got your elephant ear crew working, clear 'til dark thirty?
Our favorite technique involves buying an elephant ear and walking briskly through the Community Causeway as though in the middle of a huge bite, only to remove the large pastry from our faces once we've reached the soothing and electrifying sounds coming from the Broadway Stage.
Even as they savored an elephant ear, gawked at the squawking chickens or emerged wobbly legged from rides, fairgoers paused Sunday to reflect on what they'll miss most as the Lane County Fair ended another run.
Just recently, I saw black elephant ear (Colocasia esculenta ``Black Magic'') at a nursery in Canoga Park.
And every now and then we'll take a break and have an elephant ear.
LANDSCAPE TIPS: The trailing Blackie mixes well with other types of dark foliage including Zulu Wonder (Plectranthus ciliatus), a burgundy-stemmed trailing ground cover; the black coleus called Inky Fingers; the shiny dark Bressingham Bronze (a heuchera hybrid); and, if space permits, the huge Black Magic elephant ear plant (another newcomer to the West Coast) with 18-inch black leaves.
Whereas in the garden, bigger often seems to be better as you grow giant dahlias in the sun and steamy tropicals with elephant ear foliage in the shade, you will probably be equally content, when it comes to containers, to choose plants with small flowers and delicate, feathery or pinnate leaves.
You can still enjoy your papayas as ornamentals with their large, deeply cut leaves reminiscent of foliage found on the rice paper plant (Tetrapanax papyrifera) and elephant ear philodendron (Philodendron selloum).