Elision

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Elision

 

in prosody, the dropping of a vowel when two vowels follow consecutively at the end of one word and the beginning of another. The dropped vowel may be pronounced, but it does not count as a syllable. The rules of elision are detailed in metric and syllabic prosody. Elision does not occur in Russian poetry.

References in periodicals archive ?
Here, one liaises, without distinguishing, all final consonants when followed by vowels; there, one insists on [pronouncing] word-final vowels, when elision with the following vowel is essential [2-3].
In support of her thesis, Nic Craith explores a series of symbols and practices that are prominent in Northern Irish conflicts in order to unearth the elisions and fictions that give the illusion of a cultural polarity.
From a modern vantage, Johnson signifies on this artful elision as a historical literary trope by having his narrator evacuate the first-person subject position.
Despite the fact that the elisions provide a bridge to The Garden of Eden, for the Chulu Mountains where Mary will hunt are made much of in the manuscript as a magical place where "no white woman has ever gone" and they link the pursuit of African-ness to David and Catherine's tanning, their absence is not felt.
In "The Encantadas" the Spenserian epigram s which precede the descriptions of the desolate island places as well as other allusive devices are Melville's forms of transumption in which he attempts to appropriate the words of others with total disregard for their original property: "In his elisions, he consistently ironizes and substitutes his own meaning for that of the material he fails to quote" (123).
The notes and drawings were informative memos for those engaged in experimentation, but the elisions made presuming familiarity with the activity under way offer formidable problems for the uninitiated.
Elisions are productive blurrings of lines between movements or political modes that writers used to treat as very separate from one another.
The chronologically arranged articles combine explorations of individual genres and specific case studies: contextual readings are often employed and elisions with each historian's contemporary political concerns frequently emerge.
These elisions mirror the continuous present of Akerman's long pans and stationary camera, as if the most radical discontinuity were also the most imperceptible.
And it lies behind his unhappiness with the spreading use of the present tense among writing students, of which habit he writes, ``In conjunction with the first person, in collusion with the declarative mode, in company with stammery elisions and verbal reticence - each often illnesses in their own right - it has become that major social and artistic malaise called minimalism, itself a misnomer.
But again, assertions and elisions ripple throughout.