Elision

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Elision

 

in prosody, the dropping of a vowel when two vowels follow consecutively at the end of one word and the beginning of another. The dropped vowel may be pronounced, but it does not count as a syllable. The rules of elision are detailed in metric and syllabic prosody. Elision does not occur in Russian poetry.

References in periodicals archive ?
Those cases are subject to additional variation related to possible processes of aspiration, elision and voicing, which are not common in onset positions.
Here, one liaises, without distinguishing, all final consonants when followed by vowels; there, one insists on [pronouncing] word-final vowels, when elision with the following vowel is essential [2-3].
In support of her thesis, Nic Craith explores a series of symbols and practices that are prominent in Northern Irish conflicts in order to unearth the elisions and fictions that give the illusion of a cultural polarity.
Despite the fact that the elisions provide a bridge to The Garden of Eden, for the Chulu Mountains where Mary will hunt are made much of in the manuscript as a magical place where "no white woman has ever gone" and they link the pursuit of African-ness to David and Catherine's tanning, their absence is not felt.
By such elisions, Judson means that the crime itself isn't what's significant; it's the collection of memories and misunderstandings and vague desires that lead up to the terrible moment--the way Holgate is trapped into criminality but entirely culpable for it.
Within the lines assigned to Horace one sees six elisions, that is, an average of more than one per line.
The vowel elisions, shortened dialect forms, neologisms, and use of English words as well as the radical transgression of spelling and grammatical rules produce poetic images suggesting an infrastructure of an empirical reality similar to the photographic images of X-rays.
In "The Encantadas" the Spenserian epigram s which precede the descriptions of the desolate island places as well as other allusive devices are Melville's forms of transumption in which he attempts to appropriate the words of others with total disregard for their original property: "In his elisions, he consistently ironizes and substitutes his own meaning for that of the material he fails to quote" (123).
The notes and drawings were informative memos for those engaged in experimentation, but the elisions made presuming familiarity with the activity under way offer formidable problems for the uninitiated.
I called them "expansions," "elisions," and "economics."
I don't want a reader to growl: Adam is happy to acknowledge Lesbians, but then he's, also, happy to create his own set of elisions. Being problematically represented can be frustrating; but, equally so, it can be frustrating to not be acknowledged at-all.
However, there were many gaps, elisions, and omissions indicating that, by reporting on the habits and haunts of the urban homosexual, newspapers were increasingly forced to shroud the details of his activities in even greater mystery.