elite

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elite

1. <security> A term used to describe skilled crackers or hackers, or their deeds. In the last sense, compare to elegant.

The term is also used to describe exclusive forums (ftp sites, BBSs) used for trading pirated software, cracking tools, or phreaking codes.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

élite

literally ‘the best or most talented members of society’ (e.g. educational élite), however in sociology the term most usually refers to political élites. Here, the assumption of ÉLITE THEORY has been that a division between élites and MASSES is an inevitable feature of any complex modern society, and that the aspirations of radical democrats that the people as a whole could rule is mistaken.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000

elite

A typeface that prints 12 cpi.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Interpreting the data from local press and archives, between 1989 and 1992, will help us to see if the configuration of local elites differs from one region to another, and the same is true for the circulation or reproduction of elites.
Hoffman argues that historians too often have attributed urban physical development to all-powerful elites. Consequently, they have ignored how "American cities are the sum of the actions of all urban dwellers, not just those of the city's business and political leaders." (p.
You are being played for a bunch of fools by your legal-political elite. Your elites mumble a confusing jargon to your face to keep you from understanding what they really have in mind.
This book invites further more specific research on states and elites in the Arab world.
Whether the issue is immigration, environment, farm policy, welfare, labor policy, or dozens of other issues, a growing number of Europeans from across the political spectrum are opposing efforts to transfer authority over these matters to the arrogant elites in Brussels.
In its careful attention to the social dynamics of the creation and the reproduction of elites, the work recalls Duby's La societe aux [XI.sup.e] et [XII.sup.e] siecle dans la region maconnaise (1953).
One need not multiply examples to show that civilization--especially modern civilization-relies heavily on expertise, which is translated into the functions of specific elites in various and diverse spheres of human needs and activity.
Rael's point here is profoundly important: From at least the 1780s to the early 1800s, white and black elites engaged in open debates about the meaning of the country and the public that constituted it.
From East Germans to Germans?: The New Postcommunist Elites. By Jennifer A.
It might mean typical people are more peaceful than elites; or that typical people don't care about potential victims in South Korea, while elites are more broadminded and do care; or that elites are willing to sanction war because no one from their class will serve and die, whereas typical people and their sons and daughters do.
From barbarism to democracy, elites seek a suspect in the reported death of art.
During the 1920s and 1930s, old and new elites struggled for power at local, state, and national levels.