Eloquence

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Eloquence

Ambrose, St.
bees, prophetic of fluency, landed in his mouth. [Christian Hagiog: Brewster, 177]
Antony, Mark
gives famous speech against Caesar’s assassins. [Br. Lit.: Julius Caesar]
Arnall, Father
his sermons fill Stephen with the fear of hell-fire. [Br. Lit.: Joyce Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man]
bees on the mouth
pictorial and verbal symbol of eloquence. [Folklore and Christian Iconog.: Brewster, 177]
Bragi
god of poetry and fluent oration. [Norse Myth.: LLEI, I: 324]
Calliope
chief muse of poetic inspiration and oratory. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 177]
Churchill, Winston
(1874–1965) statesman whose rousing oratory led the British in WWII. [Br. Hist.: NCE, 556]
Cicero
(106–43 B. C.) orator whose forcefulness of presentation and melodious language is still imitated. [Rom. Hist.: NCE, 558]
Demosthenes
(382–322 B.C.) generally considered the greatest of the Greek orators. [Gk. Hist.: NCE, 559]
Gettysburg Address
Lincoln’s brief, moving eulogy for war dead (1863). [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 286–287]
King, Martin Luther, Jr
. (1929–1968) civil rights leader and clergyman whose pleas for justice won support of millions. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 1134]
lotus
symbol of eloquence. [Plant Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 175]
Mapple, Father
preaches movingly and ominously on Jonah. [Am. Lit.: Melville Moby Dick]
Paine, Thomas
(1737–1809) powerful voice of the colonies; wrote famous “Common Sense.” [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 369–370]
Webster, Daniel
(1782–1852) noted 19th-century American orator-politician. [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 539]
References in classic literature ?
It was in the midst of one of his highest flights of eloquence, that a man, so aged as to walk with the greatest difficulty, entered the very centre of the circle, and took his stand directly in front of the speaker.
In the midst of the murmurs of applause, which succeeded so remarkable an effort of eloquence, a low, feeble and hollow voice was heard rising on the ear, as if it rolled from the inmost cavities of the human chest, and gathered strength and energy as it issued into the air.
It survived his strength to hide in the magnificent folds of eloquence the barren darkness of his heart.
That is why I have re- mained loyal to Kurtz to the last, and even beyond, when a long time after I heard once more, not his own voice, but the echo of his magnificent eloquence thrown to me from a soul as translucently pure as a cliff of crystal.
He lived then before me; he lived as much as he had ever lived--a shadow insatiable of splendid appearances, of frightful realities; a shadow darker than the shadow of the night, and draped nobly in the folds of a gorgeous eloquence.
There were some strokes in this speech which perhaps would have offended Mr Allworthy, had he strictly attended to it; but he had now got one of his fingers into the infant's hand, which, by its gentle pressure, seeming to implore his assistance, had certainly out-pleaded the eloquence of Mrs Deborah, had it been ten times greater than it was.