emancipation

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emancipation

the collective freeing of a slave population in specific countries or colonial territories. The word is of Latin origin, meaning ‘to transfer ownership’. The freeing of slave populations in the Western hemisphere has usually been by issue of a legal decree, i.e. an ‘emancipation proclamation’. Britain abolished slavery in its empire in 1833, while in the US an emancipation proclamation was issued in 1862, but did not take effect until 1865, at the end of the Civil War.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
References in periodicals archive ?
Anthony's sentiment that bicycling has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world.
The protesters appealed to the International Community to come to rescue tormented people of Held Kashmir and emancipate them from Indian forced occupation and oppression as has been promised to them by the United Nations.
One of his concerns will be to emancipate the EGTCs from state control.
He pointed out that the Union will take the necessary steps, pointing out that "our will to emancipate information is unshakable and will never back down in the face of whatever challenges that the Tunisian journalists are confronting."
The residents have demanded of Chief Minister of Punjab Mian Shahbaz Sharif to take strict notice of the situation, emancipate the school building from feudal possession and start education system in the school as soon as possible to save future of the students.
(35) French law only allowed the minor's guardian or close relations, after the death of the minor's father or mother, to convene a family meeting to emancipate the minor (which Louisiana also recognized).36 No provision in early French law, either explicitly or implicitly, gave the minor the right to petition for emancipation.
And emancipate the minds in reaching Obama for his bravery,
The inventors of the female loincloth say the idea is to emancipate women from the constraints of conventional tight-fitting underwear, as well as from the hassles of finding the right size.
Now, 20,000 to 25,000 children emancipate out of foster care at 18 years of age every year across the nation, and they're left with no support--no medical, no dental, no stipend.