emancipation


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Related to emancipation: Emancipation Day

emancipation

the collective freeing of a slave population in specific countries or colonial territories. The word is of Latin origin, meaning ‘to transfer ownership’. The freeing of slave populations in the Western hemisphere has usually been by issue of a legal decree, i.e. an ‘emancipation proclamation’. Britain abolished slavery in its empire in 1833, while in the US an emancipation proclamation was issued in 1862, but did not take effect until 1865, at the end of the Civil War.
References in periodicals archive ?
When the New York legislature failed to pass an emancipation law, some slaves ran away.
On September 23, a working text of the Emancipation Proclamation is released.
Gary Nash, "Forging Freedom: The Emancipation Experience in the Northern Seaport Cities, 1775-1820," in Ira Berlin and Ronald Hoffman eds.
For example, the Emancipation Proclamation cited above freed no slaves, not even in areas retaken by the Union army.
Triumphal memories of the Exodus and any hopes of full liberation for groups had been made impractical under Roman rule, so in their place early Christians saw emancipation for individuals as an attainable and mediated facsimile.
Namely, it examines the different emancipatory experiences of Jews and Christians during the nineteenth century, while also revealing the course of emancipation in four distinct national settings: Britain, France, Germany and Italy.
He is the first Catholic to lead either of the two major parties since Catholic Emancipation in 1829.
Cleaning windows, claims Thorp, takes on a whole new meaning: "By concentrating on the simple wiping motion of the washcloth, you may begin to feel the origins of your own emancipation.
That was 12 years before Pennsylvania abolished slavery, and 53 years before Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, Brian Duperreault, chairman and chief executive officer of Ace Ltd.
Emancipation was not yet on Lincoln's agenda: Four of his Union states were slave states, and slavery continued in the federal capital.