emancipation

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emancipation

the collective freeing of a slave population in specific countries or colonial territories. The word is of Latin origin, meaning ‘to transfer ownership’. The freeing of slave populations in the Western hemisphere has usually been by issue of a legal decree, i.e. an ‘emancipation proclamation’. Britain abolished slavery in its empire in 1833, while in the US an emancipation proclamation was issued in 1862, but did not take effect until 1865, at the end of the Civil War.
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead, Lowell represents a nation reconciled through its forgetting of an emancipationist vision of Civil War memory that the Shaw Memorial once embodied and the capitalist aims its now enshrines.
As a result, Tubman came to the attention of New England-based white abolitionists who seized upon her example as the embodiment of their emancipationist ideology.
Centuries of emancipationist struggle were destroyed by the National Socialist regime, so that when Levy films his Jewish comedy, the theme of foreignness is as persistent as it was in Lessing's day, distinguished only by the presence of post-Holocaust guilt:
After 1900, he concludes, "the flame of emancipationist memory still burned, but it lit isolated enclaves in a darkening age of racial antagonism" (197, 345).
As the controversy over black summer boarding at Storer College reminds us, Clifford and others' defense of an emancipationist vision of the American past was predicated on the creation and preservation of such communities of fellow travelers and conspicuous consumers.
97) When the bill of rights in the 1868 Louisiana Constitution granted state citizenship to residents regardless of race and assured all citizens of the "same civil, political, and public rights and privileges," the choice of language reflected decades of discussion among free persons of color in Louisiana, invigorated by the emancipationist energies of the Civil War.
Nevertheless, the Giolittian era and the failure to win suffrage in 1912 exhausted the early emancipationist movement, which very much had faded away by the onset of Fascism.
The labels abolitionist and emancipationist became synonymous only after the transatlantic slave trade was outlawed in 1807.
The civil rights, black power, feminist, antiwar, gay rights, and environmentalist movements gave rise to emancipationist liberal theologies.
The programs promoted by large Italian women's associations, such as the Catholic Centro Italiano Femminile (CIF) and the left-affiliated Unione Donne Italiane (UDI), both of which were founded during the Italian Resistance, have been interpreted as emancipationist rather than liberationist.
But of course one could pose the question again: why were faculties so susceptible to that brand of emancipationist rhetoric?
Writing about the ideological differences between the nineteenth-century French abolitionist Victor Schoelcher and Schoelcher's Martinique-born contemporary Cyrille-Charles-Auguste Bissette, an emancipationist who later became a reactionary, for example, Bongie asks: "If those who claim to be absolutely different from one another are actually bound in a complicitous relation, then how can any (personal, cultural, national, racial) identity ever be secure(d)?