embolus

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embolus

(ĕm`bələs), foreign matter circulating in and obstructing a blood vessel. It may be a portion of a clot that has separated from the wall of a vessel (see thrombosisthrombosis
, obstruction of an artery or vein by a blood clot (thrombus). Arterial thrombosis is generally more serious because the supply of oxygen and nutrition to an area of the body is halted.
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), a bubble of gas or air (known as an air embolus), a globule of fat, a clump of bacterial matter, or a clump of tumor cells. It circulates freely through the vessels until it reaches one so small that it cannot go further. An embolus in one of the vessels leading to the lungs, brain, or heart, if large enough, can be fatal; in an arm or leg it may lead to gangrene and, ultimately, the need for amputation. Emergency surgical removal is usually the treatment of choice for a solid embolus. Otherwise, drugs that dilate the vessels and anticoagulants are indicated.
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embolus

[′em·bə·ləs]
(medicine)
A clot or other mass of particulate matter foreign to the bloodstream which lodges in a blood vessel and causes obstruction.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

embolus

material, such as part of a blood clot or an air bubble, that is transported by the blood stream until it becomes lodged within a small vessel and impedes the circulation
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
These include the risk of vascular perforation, ischaemia, cardiac valvular destruction, endocarditis, sepsis, venous thrombosis, thrombophlebitis, dysrhythmia, severe hypoxia, lead poisoning, impingement on local structures, infection, having psychological morbidity of leaving a foreign body inside and even transformation to a paradoxical emboli. 1 Interpreting the timing of discovery, presence of symptoms, and anatomical location of the embolus, a risk-benefit estimate can guide further management decisions.
First described in 1936, Lemierre syndrome is an uncommon but potentially life-threatening condition characterized by upper respiratory tract infection, thrombophlebitis of the neck veins, anaerobic sepsis, and systemic dissemination of septic emboli. (1) It is usually secondary to oropharyngeal infection; other causes include dental, sinus and ear infections, intravenous drug abuse and catheterization of the IJV.
The pleuritic chest pain and the progressing dyspnoea were probably due to the septic emboli from the vegetation into the pulmonary vasculature.
However in one instance, CSS software grouped one of the patients to probable large vessel athero- sclerosis, probable cardio-aortic emboli, and unclas- sified unknown etiology and in another instance one case was classified both as evident cardio-aortic emboli and possibly unknown etiology; we consid- ered them to be probable and evident respectively.
(14) If tumour groups enter the lymphovascular drainage system as emboli, rather than growing as continuous strands in the lymphatic system, malignant cells may not be visible in all sections examined.
Amputations were more with femoral and popliteal emboli than iliac and brachial.