embolus


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Related to embolus: thromboembolus

embolus

(ĕm`bələs), foreign matter circulating in and obstructing a blood vessel. It may be a portion of a clot that has separated from the wall of a vessel (see thrombosisthrombosis
, obstruction of an artery or vein by a blood clot (thrombus). Arterial thrombosis is generally more serious because the supply of oxygen and nutrition to an area of the body is halted.
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), a bubble of gas or air (known as an air embolus), a globule of fat, a clump of bacterial matter, or a clump of tumor cells. It circulates freely through the vessels until it reaches one so small that it cannot go further. An embolus in one of the vessels leading to the lungs, brain, or heart, if large enough, can be fatal; in an arm or leg it may lead to gangrene and, ultimately, the need for amputation. Emergency surgical removal is usually the treatment of choice for a solid embolus. Otherwise, drugs that dilate the vessels and anticoagulants are indicated.

embolus

[′em·bə·ləs]
(medicine)
A clot or other mass of particulate matter foreign to the bloodstream which lodges in a blood vessel and causes obstruction.

embolus

material, such as part of a blood clot or an air bubble, that is transported by the blood stream until it becomes lodged within a small vessel and impedes the circulation
References in periodicals archive ?
Although most patients remain asymptomatic, based on the location of the cement embolus, major complications may arise, including perforation of the cardiac wall.
Management of venous gas embolus begins with procedure termination, continuous oxygenation, and Trendelenburg and left lateral decubitus patient positioning.
The male embolus was inserted completely into the female vulva with the tip of the embolus inserted into the orifice of the spermatheca.
1-3) It has been hypothesized that it might be possible to selectively photodisrupt a solid embolus within a retinal arteriole without significant damage to the vessel wall.
One of the common places for an embolus to lodge is the lung.
1, 7); embolus surrounding tegulum, supported by conductor; conductor sclerotized ventrally, with retrolateral laminar projection supporting embolus tip (Figs.
In other words, pulmonary embolus as a cause for respiratory deterioration is difficult to exclude, but potentially dangerous if missed.
Acute pulmonary emboli can be classified further by degree of pulmonary artery involvement, embolus mobility, the presence or absence of a major predisposing factor, or the interaction of PE size and underlying cardiovascular status.
3) The assumption is that an embolus moves from the right atrium to the left atrium in these patients, and this results in a stroke.
Untreated bits of the clot can break off and become lodged in the lungs - a potentially fatal condition called pulmonary embolus.