embouchure


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embouchure

[¦äm·bə¦shu̇r]
(geology)
The mouth of a river.
A river valley widened into a plain.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Key Words: embouchure, wind instrumentalist, reed, inclined planes.
Biting involves using too much pressure from the bottom jaw to support the embouchure, resulting in a pinched sound and sharp pitch overall.
This relies on the effectiveness of the large muscles of the lower body, as they are central to the performer's support, centre of gravity, posture, air column and breathing, over other parameters such as embouchure and technique.
As Lie-Nemeth puts it, focal dystonia can impact the careers of instrumental musicians (patients may complain of a loss of voluntary control in the hands or embouchure when playing their instrument): the primary source of the problem is in the brain.
En une semaine, des millions de personnes avaient fui leurs villages dans la province meridionale du Sind, et evacue des grandes villes a mesure que les flots de l'Indus en furie rompaient les digues en devalant vers son embouchure dans la mer d'Oman.
Municipal trucks spewed raw sewage into the embouchure of a pristine river.
Ond doedd ei 'embouchure' (y cyhyrau sy'n gwneud y siap angenrheidiol wrth chwarae offeryn pres) ddim cweit yn iawn wedyn, felly mi newidiodd ei yrfa a mynd i'r coleg i fod yn athro ac yn ddarlithydd yn ddiweddarach yng Ngholeg Technegol Bangor."
Respondent J identified a series of pre-articulation exercises used by Suzuki for developing flute embouchure and tongue action.
During the vacation I resolved not to play at all for a month and forget about embouchure completely, and then I started again entirely from scratch--from sustained notes, from practice deliberately focused on tone.