embourgeoisement


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Related to embourgeoisement: Proletarianization, Embourgeoisement thesis

embourgeoisement

or

bourgeoisification

the process of becoming bourgeois or, more generally MIDDLE CLASS.
References in periodicals archive ?
This process of embourgeoisement is a common explanation for declining class consciousness, which is influenced by postindustrial economic change (Goldthorpe and Lockwood, 1963).
Ces changements ont provoque des transformations urbaines incessantes: renovation, embourgeoisement, et embellissement preservent Bergame en fonction d'une conception moderne du passe.
As Said notes: "[F]or nineteenth-century Europe, with its increasing embourgeoisement, sex had been institutionalized to a very considerable degree.
Ray was late, for sure, but literally so, twice over, within his own class, in that he stood at the edge of the bhadralok history of embourgeoisement where he could at best describe his own milieu well from the hindsight of the last man standing (for which he utilized techniques of defamiliarization contained very much within the realist-modernist pale including erstwhile avant-garde techniques that had become commonsensical by the time he started his career).
Their studies dispute the widely accepted theory from the period that relatively affluent workers were experiencing embourgeoisement.
The extremely rapid embourgeoisement of African National Congress (ANC) cadres, with some individuals of modest means becoming instant millionaires through the Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) scheme, is a worrisome development.
British friendly societies have often been cited as exemplars of working-class self-help (or mutual) aid, embourgeoisement, and conservatism, while the organizations are often seen to have achieved their greatest influence and popularity in the mid-Victorian era.
In a particularly insightful essay ("Guides for Wagnerites; Leitmotifs and Wagnerian Listening"), Christian Thorau examines the history of thematic guides to Wagner's operas and argues that "leitmotivic reception" of these works was a "central symptom of the embourgeoisement of Wagner's music" (pp.
This endeavor was, for many artists, emblematic of their revulsion for art's embourgeoisement.
In concert with these attitudes, and in line with Cooper and Stoler's ideas on the embourgeoisement of imperialism, the great Victorian "sanitary idea" of public health, disease, and cities had by the mid-nineteenth century moved from Britain to the colonial cities of its empire, and the Colonial Legislature and the city sought to follow suit.
In the nineteenth century the bourgeoisie, to a great degree, determined the nature and course of a very public Protestantism; one might say that Protestantism underwent a process of embourgeoisement.
Western world from spiritual death by embourgeoisement, anti-bourgeois