embrasure


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embrasure

an opening forming a door or window, having splayed sides that increase the width of the opening in the interior

Embrasure

The crenels or spaces between the merlons of a battlement; an enlargement of a door or window opening at the inside face of a wall by means of splayed sides.

embrasure

[em′brā·zhər]
(architecture)
Opening in a wall or parapet, especially one through which a gun is fired.
An opening such as for a door or window with sloping or beveled sides.

embrasure

embrasure: B
1. The crenels or intervals between the merlons of a battlement.
2. An enlargement
References in periodicals archive ?
It was unlikely in this case that the embrasure space could be completely filled by the gingiva even after altering the crown morphology or increasing the emergence profile of the restorations.
Taking a deep breath, he went back to the embrasure. It was narrow, made for an archer.
Today, in majority of the adult population with a history of periodontal disease, open gingival embrasures are a common problem.
Barbara Guest writes in Forces of Imagination that "The structure of a poem should create an embrasure inside of which language is seated in watchful docility, like the unicorn." Yet we know that language can bite too.
Direct retainer, embrasure clasp was placed in the embressue of 37 and 36, 35 and 34 and cingulum rest on 33.
Cusps that tend to forcibly wedge food into interproximal embrasure are known as plunger cusps.
Application of the embrasure saddle clasp in partial denture design; Chicago Dental Society Midwinter Meeting; Feb 1936; Chicago.
Shafts of light are deployed not only to bring out the lustre of the gilt-tooled spines of volumes of L'Histoire naturelle piled up at Eastnor Castle and to represent the reflection of the polished marble floors of the Codrington Library at All Souls, Oxford, and the Library at Trinity College, Cambridge, but also--more interestingly--to create fractured, almost abstract compositions: for example, an open book on a windowledge in the library of the Society of Antiquaries, London, looking out towards the courtyard of Burlington House, or a book placed on a William Kent chair in a window embrasure at Houghton.
Interproximal extension: The laminate preparation must be extended into the embrasure areas to ensure that the margin between the veneer and the unprepared tooth structure is hidden.
Conventional embrasure clasp was planned on maxillary right permanent first premolar, second premolar, and first and second molars.
Adequate embrasure space and proper tooth position.
4), the crowned figures set inside a window embrasure, and the last work by the artist remaining in private hands, also far exceeded expectations, selling to Browse and Darby on behalf of the Peter Moores Foundation at Compton Verney for just over a 1m [pounds sterling], another auction record.