embryo rescue

embryo rescue

[′em·brē·ō ′res·kyü]
(genetics)
A technique for crossing wild and domestic species of plants in which the wild species is used as the male parent, and the embryos are excised approximately one month after pollination and placed on an artificial medium, where a small fraction survive.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Nicholas Tonti-Filippini, 'The Embryo Rescue Debate".
To develop a successful new grape, these scientists carefully select parent grape plants, cross (also known as "hybridize") them, then apply embryo rescue tactics (see box at right) to produce healthy seedlings.
Ramming pioneered use of embryo rescue several decades ago to breed superb seedless grapes.
Not only that, he advocates the perennialization of existing annuals by embryo rescue which he describes in the following way.
Nicholas Tonti-Filippini, "The Embryo Rescue Debate".
But Miller saved time using embryo rescue, a technique that skips such processes by regenerating whole plants from cultures of embryonic tissue.
pinnatisectum--with a derivative of a commercial potato variety, using a technique known as embryo rescue.
The researchers had one more roll of the dice: embryo rescue.
Of the 126 remaining lines, 76 pulled through, thanks to the embryo rescue - despite many having been stored more than 19 years.
Embryo culture, says Ramming, is sometimes called embryo rescue because researchers recover tiny embryos that likely wouldn't survive in nature.
But a viable cross between the two species can involve time-consuming and expensive techniques such as embryo rescue, says ARS cytogeneticist Bryan K.