blastomere

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blastomere

[′blas·tə‚mir]
(embryology)
A cell of a blastula.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other animal embryos grow outside the mother, however, so their embryonic cells get right to work accepting assignments, such as becoming head, tail or vital organs.
Implantation of neural embryonic cells into the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease improved their ability to move, according to the results of a study published in the June issue of the Archives of Neurology.
When the researchers switched off the gene for this protein using genetic maneuvers, development remained stuck in the embryonic cell cluster stage.
The NIH action followed the British government's plan to introduce legislation amending a ban on human cloning that will permit scientific research on embryonic cells (Transplant News, August 28/September 15, 2000).
The National Bioethics Advisory Commission, appointed by President Clinton 10 months ago to weigh the ethical pros and cons of the use of stem cells for research, has strongly recommended that research on embryonic cells be allowed.
They discovered that during the first stage, skin cells lose their cellular identity and then slowly acquire a new identity of one of the three early embryonic cell types, and that this process is governed by the levels of two of the five genes.
New insights to differences in preimplantation embryonic cells bring to light the importance of microscopic analysis in assisted reproduction procedures
Modal chromosome number and karyotype of the embryonic cell line are identical with the H.
By contrast, embryonic cell research has produced much hype but few reports of clinical successes, and are controversial due to the inevitable destruction of the embryos from which the stem cells are harvested.
Embryonic cell lines and autologous embryonic stem cells generated through therapeutic cloning have also been proposed as promising candidates for future therapies.
Increased egg-laying in Orius insidiosus (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae) fed artificial diet supplemented with an embryonic cell line.
The cells, derived from NIH registered human embryonic cell lines, are offered as a normal, consistent population of neural cells in an adherent monolayer format, a product never before offered to the research community.