Emergence


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emergence

[ə′mər·jəns]
(geology)
Dry land which was part of the ocean floor.
The act or process of becoming an emergent land mass.
(hydrology)

Emergence

 

an outgrowth on the surface of stems and leaves formed, in contrast to hair, not only by the epidermis but by underlying tissues. Emergences include the stinging hairs of nettle, the thorns on rose stems and thorn apples, and the glandular hairs on sundew (Drosera).

References in periodicals archive ?
The results of Experiment 1 indicate that learning the A-B and B-C intraverbals is sufficient for some adults to show the emergence of the remaining ABC intraverbals.
The percentages of emergence were the smallest and did not differ significantly at 15[degrees]C and 35[degrees]C (Table 1); however the latter percentages (60.
Oviposition in the development was very high, which promises a large emergence in 2021.
Variation in response among individuals to antigenic sites on the HA protein of human influenza virus may be responsible for the emergence of drift strains in the human population.
Emergence and Lindgren traps were installed at a longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.
The coated seeds planted in early spring took longer to reach 90 percent emergence than seeds that were planted in late spring.
The incidence of emergence agitation was not affected by the number of operated eyes in group M.
Because some of the treatment combinations had no emergence and hence zero variance, we compared results of this model with P values computed through permutation using Cassell's (2002) macro for SAS.
The county distribution of this brood has not changed in over a century; however, the 2007 emergence was quite spotty and reduced compared to the previous emergence in 1990 (Kritsky & Young 1991).
Along these lines, Brown's use of emergence is not one of radical discontinuity between mental functions in humans and those in nonhuman animals; instead, he blurs this continuum.
We are not saying that no emergence happens in the spring, simply that there is a lot less spring emergence than people generally think.
He is of the school of strong emergence that observes that "the natural world increasingly reveals distinct levels of organization, with each level characterized by its own irreducible types of causal influence and explanation" (204).