emf


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emf:

see electromotive forceelectromotive force,
abbr. emf, difference in electric potential, or voltage, between the terminals of a source of electricity, e.g., a battery from which no current is being drawn. When current is drawn, the potential difference drops below the emf value.
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emf

(physical chemistry)

electromotive force

The force which causes (or tends to cause) the movement of electricity in a conductor; the difference in potential between the terminals of an electric source.

EMF

(1) (Enhanced MetaFile) See Windows metafile.

(2) (ElectroMagnetic Field) An area of electrical or magnetic radiation. See electromagnetic radiation.

(3) (ElectroMotive Force) Electrical energy measured in volts.
References in periodicals archive ?
The other elements of the SG, including switchgear, protective and measuring equipment of the TS, as well as input and output twisted three-phase cables, also practically do not affect the EMF of the TS [9].
Stabilizer/Inverter: These "purchase and forget" appliances are the highest sources of in-premise EMF.
The EMF was generated by switching on the internet data connection for 60 minutes daily for 2 months.
In this case, after 2 h of EMF expose from the beginning of the treatment, a significant decrease in the percentage of concentration MPN/100ml.
Life on earth is extensively exposed to ELF EMF produced by these artificial sources.
But some studies such as Buschmann and Bornkessel [8], the high frequency EMF gestational exposure at 900 MHz hadn't considerable teratogenic, embryolethal or retarding effects in rat.
The ETUC, EMCEF and EMF stressed the impact of climate change and energy prices on these sectors, as well as the problem of raw materials.
The EMF will be an EU version of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) aiming at guaranteeing the Eurozone's financial stability.