emigration

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emigration:

see immigrationimmigration,
entrance of a person (an alien) into a new country for the purpose of establishing permanent residence. Motives for immigration, like those for migration generally, are often economic, although religious or political factors may be very important.
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; migrationmigration,
of people, geographical movements of individuals or groups for the purpose of permanently resettling. Early History

Migrations have occurred throughout history and have played an important part in the peopling of all the areas of the earth.
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emigration

See MIGRATION.

Emigration

 

the movement of people from one country to another to establish permanent or temporary residence, usually with the aim of finding work. Emigration may be permanent or temporary, even seasonal. In seasonal emigration the time of stay is limited by contract or other terms of hire; for example, the emigrant may be allowed to stay for the gathering of the harvest. In addition to emigration for economic reasons, population movements take place for political, ethnic, and religious reasons. In the second half of the 20th century the principal waves of emigration have been from Western Europe to the USA, Canada, Australia, and several other countries—primarily permanent emigration—and from developing countries to Western Europe— usually temporary emigration by laborers who work for low wages. (See alsoHUMAN MIGRATION.)

V. V. POKSHISHEVSKII

emigration

[‚em·ə′grā·shən]
(ecology)
The movement of individuals or their disseminules out of a population or population area.
References in classic literature ?
Supper dishes washed, he cut shavings and kindling for a quick and certain breakfast fire, showed Anson a trick with foot-gear that was invaluable to any hiker, sang his "Like Argus of the Ancient Times," and told them of the great emigration across the Plains in Forty-nine.
The emigration still continued, and wherever families could find means of departure, they fled.
In this emigration I exceedingly lamented the loss of the fire which I had obtained through accident and knew not how to reproduce it.
Time was necessary to blend the numerous and affluent colonists of the lower province with their new compatriots; but the thinner and more humble population above, was almost immediately swallowed in the vortex which attended the tide of instant emigration.
Few people would live in Washington, I take it, who were not obliged to reside there; and the tides of emigration and speculation, those rapid and regardless currents, are little likely to flow at any time towards such dull and sluggish water.
Though not as big as the epic Italian emigrations of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when millions boarded ships bound for the Americas or far-off Australia, or took trains to the better-off lands of Western Europe, the figures are nevertheless alarming.
As a member of the National Welsh/American Foundation I have traced my own ancestral emigrations from South Wales, mainly to Pennsylvania, from 1662 up to the 1880s.