emission


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emission

1. energy, in the form of heat, light, radio waves, etc., emitted from a source
2. a measure of the number of electrons emitted by a cathode or electron gun
3. Physiol any bodily discharge, esp an involuntary release of semen during sleep

emission

1. The release of light or other radiation from an excited atom or molecule, or the radiation so emitted. See emission spectrum; nonthermal emission; thermal emission.
2. The liberation of electrons from the surface of a solid or liquid. See photoelectric effect.

emission

[i′mish·ən]
(electromagnetism)
Any radiation of energy by means of electromagnetic waves, as from a radio transmitter.
(meteorology)
A natural or anthropogenic discharge of particulate, gaseous, or soluble waste material or pollution into the air.

emission

The radiation of energy (for example, electromagnetic, heat, light, or sound).
References in periodicals archive ?
Environmental Protection Agency and the European Union (EU) implemented two separate standards--one for on-highway truck engines, another for off-road use--regulating emissions.
The protocol requires all Annex I (developed nation) signatories to jointly reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 5.
Another emission reduction strategy is to cut idling time of vessels and tugboats by providing electric power on shore.
In a little-noticed 2003 article in the academic journal Environmental Science and Technology, Professor Jonathan Levy and colleagues from the Harvard School of Public Health reported that emissions from seven coal-fired Southern Co.
At this point, the industry remains cautiously optimistic that a number of companies will be able to sell surplus credits--generated either by overachieving on their targets at pulp and paper mills or from emission reductions in other areas of their operations.
There are more and deadlier gases out there than greenhouse emissions.
As some industry observers note, PZEVs--whose tailpipes are more than 90 percent cleaner than the average 2003 production car, and produce zero evaporative emissions (the vapors that escape from fuel .
The initiative in which 1st Rochdale is participating will focus on homes that are able to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by increasing their energy efficiency.
The forward acoustic stimulus used to evoke an emission can also be reduced by faulty middle ear transduction.
The second most important greenhouse emission, methane, began to decrease its rate of increase in 1981 some 15 years before the 1996 IPCC report on climate change, which projected an increased rate of emissions for the next 50 years.