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emitter

[i′mid·ər]
(computer science)
A time pulse generator found in some equipment, such as a card punch.
(electronics)
A transistor region from which charge carriers that are minority carriers in the base are injected into the base, thus controlling the current flowing through the collector; corresponds to the cathode of an electron tube. Symbolized E. Also known as emitter region.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

emitter

A device radiating in usable visible, IR (infrared), or RF (radio frequency) wavelengths.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

emitter

One side of a bipolar transistor. See collector.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
EMIT boss Eamon Moore said: "We have been looking closely at several acquisition opportunities for some time.
For example, the caregiver emits the mand "Give me the ball," and the child echoes "ball." 1.2.
In conclusion, enzymatic pretreatment of urine samples before Emit screening for benzodiazepines yields a highly significant gain in sensitivity of 20% at the cutoff value of 0.2 mg/L oxazepam.
Coal emissions are higher than for any other fossil fuel: A natural gas plant emits just 42 percent as much CO2 as a conventional coal plant.
In addition to the above requirements for emissions units with a potential to emit after control that is greater than or equal to major source status, CAM plans must be submitted as a part of a significant permit revision under Part 70 or 71.
The hotter areas emit larger amounts of infrared radiation and are lighter in color; the cooler areas appear darker.
Ordinarily, when an atom emits a gamma ray, it recoils.
(The next time you use a gallon of oil-based paint, you will release into the air about the same volume of hydrocarbons a top-quality auto emits when driven 5,000 miles.)
We used both an enzyme-multiplied immunoassay technique (EMIT; Behring) and a monoclonal fluorescence polarization immunoassay (mFPIA; Abbott) to assay in parallel 163 EDTA-anticoagulated blood samples from 87 heart transplant patients.
Another regulatory trigger that could be exceeded involves state-implemented Reasonable Achievable Control Technology (RACT) requirements for facilities that emit VOCs at annual rates that exceed limits specified in the particular regulation.
So, they emit, or give off, the extra energy as glowing, colored light.
Obviously these permanently-"on" EMF sources represent far more risk than our appliances, which emit very local fields Only when in use.