emitter-coupled logic


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emitter-coupled logic

[i′mid·ər ¦kəp·əld ′läj·ik]
(electronics)
A form of current-mode logic in which the emitters of two transistors are connected to a single current-carrying resistor in such a way that only one transistor conducts at a time. Abbreviated ECL.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ECL

(Emitter-Coupled Logic) A digital circuit composed of bipolar transistors in which the emitter ends are wired together. ECL gates switch faster than TTL gates, but consume more power. See TTL, I2L and bipolar transistor.
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References in periodicals archive ?
An emitter-coupled logic flip-flop usually will oscillate without an input signal.
In the past, because prescalers were manufactured using bipolar CMOS (BiCMOS) technology, they used emitter-coupled logic, which requires a fixed supply voltage that must be maintained at a minimum of 2.3 V to ensure that the transistors are operating in their active regions.