mental illness

(redirected from emotional disturbance)
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mental illness

any of various disorders in which a person's thoughts, emotions, or behaviour are so abnormal as to cause suffering to himself, herself, or other people

mental illness

disease of the mind. Mental illness varies from transitory episodes of anxiety or depression (see NEUROSES) which interfere with normal daily living through the mood changes involved, to the PSYCHOSES which may require in-patient psychiatric treatment to control the severe changes in mood and behaviour associated with them.

A sociology of mental illness has developed as a response to epidemiological studies which have pointed to social causes of mental illness (e.g. depression and bad housing), and from the impetus of the theories of the anti-psychiatrists, such as LAING (1960) and Szasz (1961). See also ANTI-PSYCHIATRY, MADNESS.

mental illness

[′men·təl ′il·nəs]
(psychology)
Any form of mental aberration; usually refers to a chronic or prolonged disorder in which there are wide deviations from the normal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Parents, guardians, or caretakers of children with serious emotional disturbance
The research also found that dogs that failed to complete their weight loss programme had worse quality of life at the outset than those successfully losing weight, most notably worse vitality and greater emotional disturbance.
The federal criteria for emotional disturbance found in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA, 1997; IDEIA, 2004) specify that a student must exhibit one or more of five characteristics, over a long period of time, and to a marked degree that adversely affects educational performance.
According to the United States Department of Education (USDOE) approximately 2% of school-age children in the United States have been determined to have some form of an emotional disturbance.
Marsh (2004) observed that students with emotional disturbance often have multiple problems, observing, as one example, that only 42% graduate from high school.
The first section of Volume I focuses on the children and students being served under IDEA, including trends in numbers and percentages of infants, toddlers, preschool, and school-age children served; declassification of elementary school-age students; and characteristics of secondary students served for emotional disturbance.
The improvements in IDEA associated with the use of the RTI eligibility determination model are also being applied to evaluations for other eligibility categories including Emotional Disturbance (Gresham, 2005; Kavale, Holdnack, & Mostert, 2005).
108-446), defines students eligible for special education services as those who meet the criteria for one or more of the following: autism, hearing impairment, mental retardation, orthopedic impairment, other health impairment (which includes attention deficit hyperactivity disorder), serious emotional disturbance (now referred to as emotional disturbance), specific learning disability, speech or language impairment, traumatic brain injury, and visual impairment.
The Study of Personnel Needs in Special Education (2002) reported that in comparison to other special education categories, "positions for teachers of students with emotional disturbance seem particularly difficult to fill, and the teachers in those positions, as a group, are less well prepared than their colleagues" (p.
Dr Bates said: "My principle concerns would be that we would end up mixing children with young adolescents who have more severe emotional disturbance and psychotic disorders.
An estimated 6 percent to 11 percent of the population has a serious emotional disturbance or mental illness, Deichert said.
The remaining subjects to be addressed in the project before the official final text is published are landowner and possessor liability and the conditions for recovery for stand-alone emotional disturbance.