empirical sociology

empirical sociology

any form of sociology which places emphasis on the collection and analysis of data. However, more specifically the term refers to forms of sociology using SOCIAL SURVEYS or carefully documented PARTICIPANT OBSERVATION.

Sociology of this latter type has represented a major strand within the discipline as a whole, especially within US sociology (e.g. empirical studies of SOCIAL STRATIFICATION, CLASS, VOTING BEHAVIOUR). This general approach to sociology has sometimes been criticized as failing to explore important questions of theory (see ABSTRACTED EMPIRICISM), or, in the case of questionnaire-based and statistical research, as involving MEASUREMENT BY FIAT (see ETHNOMETHODOLOGY, OFFICIAL STATISTICS). However, these charges can be countered as far too sweeping, by pointing to the existence of much empirical sociology in which significant theoretical hypotheses are explored (see EMPIRICISM, LAZARSFELD, THEORIES OF THE MIDDLE RANGE).

References in periodicals archive ?
Adorno's contributions to empirical sociology have not played an important role in his American profile.
We need to be able to discuss openly the fact that many post-structuralist and cultural studies theorists without training in empirical sociology are intolerant of just the kind of methodological diversity we need to keep the discipline strong.
However, Hesmondhalgh tempers this critical political economy approach by employing aspects of empirical sociology of culture, communication and cultural studies.
Equally certainly, empirical sociology, particularly in its ethnographic mode, is marked by a preoccupation with the grubby details of life in hospitals and doctors' offices that often seems far removed from any higher analytic issues.
1) However, in the absence in Britain of a tradition of research in empirical sociology to parallel the classic Chicago studies of the gang during the 1920s and 1930s, our knowledge of youth-gang formation in British cities prior to the Second World War remains patchy.
Tracing the concept from Comte through the Vienna school philosophers (Schlick, Neurath, Carnap, and Hahn, for example), to the logical empiricism of Hempel, Oppenheimer, and Nagel, Giddens carefully works through the relationships between philosophical debates about positivism and the development of empirical sociology.
Empirical sociology resulted from a growing concern with urban social problems and their amelioration.
A theoretically driven, empirical sociology as an institutionalized discipline came late to Great Britain, for a variety of reasons (Lepenies 1988; Kumar 2001; Abrams 1968).
Articles cover such topics as ethics, legal issues, research design tools, data quality, middleware for distributed data management, analysis of social networks, nonreactive data collection, survey methods and design, interviewing, focus groups, multi-user virtual environments, video analysis, access for secondary analysis, geographical data, data mining, artificial intelligence, longitudinal statistical modeling, qualitative research, empirical sociology, and the relation between online research methods and social theory.
In short, the author writes from a clear and forthright perspective, deals sympathetically and very widely with a huge variety of issues, and argues knowledgeably from within a considerable number of disciplinary perspectives (history, cultural studies, women's studies, feminist theory, empirical sociology, anthropology, the psychoanalytic tradition, Marxism, men's studies, etc.

Full browser ?