employment

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employment

any activity engaged in for wages or salary In sociology, there has always been a healthy scepticism about the simple equating of paid employment with work, yet in the wider society the prevailing meaning of the word is just that – so, ‘an active woman, running a house and bringing up children, is distinguished from a woman who works: that is to say, takes paid employment’ (R. Williams, 1976).

Sociologists have long been aware that WAGE LABOUR, to give its technical name, is only a particular form of work, gaining its centrality and definition from the specific set of productive relations which occurs within capitalist, market-exchange economies. Work, in such societies, is identified with employment, which involves ‘the sale and purchase of labour power as a commodity in a market, resulting in the direction of activity during “working hours” by persons who have acquired the right to do so by virtue of the labour contract’ (Purcell, 1986). See also PRODUCTIVE AND UNPRODUCTIVE LABOUR, LABOUR THEORY OF VALUE, SOCIOLOGY OF WORK, PRIVATE AND PUBLIC SPHERES, DOMESTIC LABOUR.

References in classic literature ?
The postscript which she had made me add to my letter; the incomprehensible withdrawal from the employment in which she was prospering; the disheartening difficulties which had brought her to the brink of starvation; the degrading return to the man who had cruelly deceived her--all was explained, all was excused now!
In the car-house your first employment will be sweeping up, washing the windows, keeping things clean.
Neither my mother's evident astonishment at my behaviour, nor Pesca's fervid enumeration of the advantages offered to me by the new employment, had any effect in shaking my unreasonable disinclination to go to Limmeridge House.
He did not believe that any honest work was a "dirty employment." In one of his poems he says:
then be severe: If studious, copy fair what Time hath blurr'd, Redeem truth from his jaws: if soldier, Chase brave employment with a naked sword
Much has been written about the employment effects of the recession, with many reports focusing on the change in overall or specific sector employment over the course of the recession.
The cohort component method, which analyzes changes within age cohorts between two time periods, was used to construct a projection of what employment would have been if there had been no recession.
The period 2004-2007 is used to represent a typical nonrecessionary period, and employment change is calculated for 5-year age cohorts over that period.
where [E.x;z,y] is employment of cohort age range x through z in year y.
To implement this cohort component model, microdata from the Current Population Survey (CPS) for the years 2004 and 2007 were used to calculate employment for each cohort.