empty-cell process

empty-cell process

[′em·tē ‚sel ′präs·əs]
(engineering)
A wood treatment in which the preservative coats the cells without filling them.

empty-cell process

A method of impregnating wood with fluid preservatives under pressure.
References in periodicals archive ?
The high price of oil made the creosote process expensive, so an empty-cell process was developed by Max Ruping of Germany, and patented in 1902.