empyema

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empyema

(ĕmpē-ē`mə), persistent purulent discharge into a cavity such as the pleural space or the gallbladder. Empyema results as a complication of bacterial infections such as pneumonia and lung abscess. It is now relatively rare because of the widespread availability of therapy for the infections that precipitate the disease.

Empyema

 

the accumulation of pus in a closed body cavity or in a hollow organ if the outlet for the pus is blocked by a concrement or inflammatory infiltrate. Empyema may develop after purulent inflammation of the walls of a cavity or organ caused by shifting of the inflammatory process from the nearest organ, for example, from bone to the walls of a joint cavity in osteomyelitis. It also occurs after direct penetration of the infection into a cavity upon injury to its wall, for example, after rupture of a pulmonary abscess into the pleural cavity. The symptoms of empyema vary depending on whether the condition is acute or chronic and on the site of the infection. They may include a high fever, intoxication, pain, and change in the blood composition.

Treatment may require removal of the affected organ, for example, in suppurative appendicitis and suppurative cholecystitis. In some cases the purulent cavity is opened, pus is removed and the cavity is drained, for example, in suppurative pleurisy (thoracic empyema) or suppurative arthritis.

empyema

[‚em‚pī′ē·mə]
(medicine)
The presence of pus in the body cavity, hollow organ, or tissue space; when the term is used without qualification, it generally refers to pus in the pleural space.
References in periodicals archive ?
After undergoing surgery, during which a subdural empyema as well as adjacent parenchymal abscesses were identified and drained, the patient had an extended stay in the hospital on intravenous antibiotics and was subsequently transferred to a rehabilitation facility.
Intracranial extension with complicating dural venous thrombosis, venous infarctions, subdural empyema, and parenchymal hemorrhages can be identified on CT; however, they are often better seen on contrast-enhanced MRI.
The aims of this study were to identify the bacterial causes of empyema in children by using molecular techniques and to assess the efficacy of PCV7 by using molecular typing of invasive pneumococcal disease serotypes.
The Australian Research Network in Empyema was established in April 2007 and comprises all 13 major tertiary pediatric hospitals from all states and territories.
Objective: Parapneumonic pleural effusions show a wide range, from minimal-uncomplicated pleural effusions to complicated effusions and empyema.
Material and Method: A total of 42 patients treated for complicated parapneumonic effusion and empyema, and having tube thoracostomy in the period of January 2000-December 2007, were included in the study.
Fusobacterium necrophorum was identified in blood culture on day nine The patient recovered with antibiotics and surgical interventions for empyema and septic arthritis Fusobacterium necrophorum should be a suspected pathogen in septic shock complicated by metastatic abscess formation.
Key Words: shock, multi-organ dysfunction syndrome, pulmonary cavitation, empyema, septic joint, Lemierre's syndrome
dagger]) Empyema, necrotizing pneumonia, pneumatocele, or pneumothorax.
ABSTRACT: Empyema necessitatis is a collection of inflammatory tissue that ruptures spontaneously through a weakness in the chest wall into surrounding soft tissues.
EMPYEMA NECESSITATIS is a collection of inflammatory tissue that usually extends directly from the pleural cavity into the thoracic chest wall, forming a mass in the extrapleural soft tissues, following anatomic boundaries.
In the Journal, Stallworth et al (15) report a case of CA-MRSA empyema necessitatis in an 8-month-old infant.