emu


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emu

or

emeu

(both: ē`myo͞o), common name for a large, flightless bird of Australia, related to the cassowarycassowary
, common name for a flightless, swift-running, pugnacious forest bird of Australia and the Malay Archipelago, smaller than the ostrich and emu. The plumage is dark and glossy and the head and neck unfeathered, wattled, and brilliantly colored, with variations in the
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 and the ostrichostrich,
common name for a large flightless bird (Struthio camelus) of Africa and parts of SW Asia, allied to the rhea, the emu and the extinct moa. It is the largest of living birds; some males reach a height of 8 ft (244 cm) and weigh from 200 to 300 lb (90–135
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. There is only one living species, Dromaius novaehollandiae. It is 5 to 6 ft (150–180 cm) tall and a very swift runner. The head and neck are feathered. The six or seven dark green eggs, laid in a sandy pit, are sometimes incubated by the male and require 56 days to hatch. The emu is easily tamed. Emus are raised for meat and eggs, leather, and oil, which is rendered from their fat. The emu is classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Struthioniformes, family Dromaiidae.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

emu

[′ē‚myü]
(electromagnetism)
(vertebrate zoology)
Dromiceius novae-hollandiae. An Australian ratite bird, the second largest living bird, characterized by rudimentary wings and a feathered head and neck without wattles.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

emu

a large Australian flightless bird, Dromaius novaehollandiae, similar to the ostrich but with three-toed feet and grey or brown plumage: order Casuariiformes
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

EMU

(Economic and Monetary Union) The consolidation of European currencies into one monetary unit called the "euro," which phased in on January 1, 1999. Accounting systems that dealt with the currencies of the participating countries had to deal with both native and euro values. On January 1, 2002, euro notes and coins were made available, with national currencies withdrawn by March 1 of that year. Public and private companies spent more than $150 billion (USD equivalent) modifying their information systems. As of January 1, 2015, the following countries use the euro:


Austria
Belgium
Cyprus
Estonia
Finland
France
Germany
Greece
Ireland
Italy
Latvia
Lithuania
Luxembourg
Malta
Netherlands
Portugal
Slovakia
Slovenia
Spain
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, separating out the effects of EU appears to come at a "cost" of significantly reducing the estimated export effects of EMU. Recall the preferred specification in col.
Although purchasing younger stock is cheaper (fertile eggs for around $25 and day-old chicks for around $100), emus do not reach sexual maturity until they are two years old.
Incidence of Chronic Respiratory Disease in Emus. Inventi Impact Infection.
The purpose of these arrangements was to limit national policy sovereignty of EMU member states so as to make their policies consistent with the pursuit of price stability by the ECB.
The ordered sets of trips undertaken by the same EMU during the period of two adjacent maintenances are called one EMU circulation.
A final decision on the emu underpasses will be made later in the year but Whale said he was pessimistic about the birds ever using them, given their lack of intelligence - a problem that can make it hard simply to shoo them out of fenced fields.
Emu aims to achieve this objective by the application of sound geoscientific and commercial criteria and, where appropriate, by partnering with other companies which have the skills and financial resources to add value to Emu Nickel's projects.
Letting one member fail would create speculative pressure on other EMU governments with weak fiscal positions or shallow domestic bond markets.
JULIA: The DC @ EMU is a showcase for our faculty and students' intellectual achievements, as well as a place to share materials that document our university's history.
Hannah Jones, who lives on the family-run farm, has had the emu for two years.