emulate

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emulate

To imitate the operation of another device or platform. It enables another digital standard to be processed by equipment that normally deals with its own native format or protocol. See emulator.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bolstered by early modern definitions of classical emulative theory, his arguments look at the application of rhetorical emulation on the stage.
In short, Freudian psychoanalysis is heavily invested in the fabrication of virtual spaces of play where one may simultaneously conjure and relegate the symptom to a realm of simulation, not unlike how the analyst becomes an emulative space for the analysand, a surrogate body or avatar, via transference.
Loy's speaker then wonders if this act of compenetration is merely a projection of the ego, nothing but a "shallow sound of dissonance / and boom of escaping breath"--a description keenly physical and emulative of laughter.
The realistic approach and sincerity with which the Japanese Government and entrepreneurs alike pursued the course of development is highly emulative.
In his post-biblical existence, Rudolf is inscribed into a logic of pre-figuration and fulfillment that, in turn, prescribes an emulative attitude on his (and therefore our) part' (sic.
Since these few men could not attend dozens of local fairs, farmers had to go to the county fair for their instruction and emulative example.
Ozawa examines interactive/emulative growth between the US (the lead goose) and the region's catching-up economies--and among the latter themselves--exploring how emulative learning has spread from Japan to other Asian economies.
When she was inculcating true values in the children of her second family, her children back home must have grown up without all those emulative qualities of their mother.
35) The laughter of Milton's deceptive God in Book Eight of Paradise Lost, by Blake's well-focused precision, echoes directly upon the ears of Urizen's "tygers of wrath" in Night the Second of The Four Zoas (24:9-15, 25:1-6), beasts that have turned the heavens into a sinful Desert Wilderness, while a few pages later in Night the Second (29:8-10) Blake's "Architect divine" (satanic Urizen as Milton's godly "great Architect") "Unfolds" the secret "plan" of his "wondrous" heavens, imagery emulative of Book Seven in Paradise Lost (93-97), where "secrets" might "unfold" the complexity of God's extensive celestial "Empire," to Blake's reckoning an Evil Empire (my emphases).
The text is realized only as an emulative act on the part of the reader, which is also paradoxically an act of creation and by way of a path of differences reveals the original authorial initiative as the supra-personal event it in truth always had been.
Since the late 1930s, public policy underwrote the expansion of consumer credit as a means of creating demand in response to the Depression-era collapse of consumer spending and to reinforce a nascent popular consumer culture built on emulative spending and the rapid diffusion of new goods.
Latif's attitude towards political competition, as to other types of competition, was that it should be emulative.