encaustic tile


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encaustic tile

A tile for pavement and wall decoration, in which the pattern is inlaid or incrusted in clay of one color in a ground of clay of another color. See also: Tile

encaustic tile

part of a Medieval pavement of encaustic tiles
A tile for pavement and wall decoration, in which the pattern is inlaid or incrusted in clay of one color in a ground of clay of another color.
References in periodicals archive ?
It took Minton years of experimentation to perfect the inlaying process, but by the 1840s, they had re-established encaustic tiles as standard floor decoration, encouraged by the famous architect and designer AWN Pugin, who used encaustic tiles extensively in his building projects.
These kilns supplied decorative encaustic tiles to all the great medieval buildings in the area and of course the school badge.
Encaustic tiles are thicker than conventional floor tiles but if you need extra pieces, use thinner tiles and pack underneath with extra adhesive.
ITS glorious 140ft by 72ft mosaic floor is made up of 30,000 individual encaustic tiles, made by the Minton factory in The Potteries.
This month, a key element of the park's architectural centrepiece shines once more: the Bethesda Terrace Arcade ceiling, composed of almost 16,000 handmade Minton encaustic tiles.
Nine people are now employed from workshops in Charles Street and Mr Hornsby has developed the business to include the manufacture of furniture and encaustic tiles.
The main door in the south face leads to the Vestibule or Entrance Hall, which has a floor of encaustic tiles which depict the arms of Liverpool.
George and Arthur Maw took over Walter Chamberlain's Worcester factory in 1850 and moved their tile works to Benthall in Shropshire in 1852, where they quickly began to rival Minton's in the range and reach of their encaustic tiles.
The encaustic tiles were made by the Minton factory in the Potteries.
Its glorious 140ft by 72ft mosaic floor is made up of 30,000 individual encaustic tiles, made by the Minton factory, in the Potteries, and laid in 1852, at a cost of pounds 3,000.
They were encaustic tiles, which meant the clay itself was coloured, as opposed to a colour being fired on to the surface.