encipher

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encipher

[en′sī·fər]
(communications)
To convert a plain-text message into unintelligible language by means of a cryptosystem. Also known as encrypt.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

encryption

The reversible transformation of data from the original (plaintext) to a difficult-to-interpret format (ciphertext) as a mechanism for protecting its confidentiality, integrity and sometimes its authenticity. Encryption uses an encryption algorithm and one or more encryption keys. See encryption algorithm and cryptography.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Since the size of the compressed image is usually larger than that of text data, it is also invalid to reduce the size of the picture by image compression before enciphering. Chang and Liou's image cryptosystem [6] is in this form.
Since the size of the auxiliary data is usually less than that of the compressed image, the time complexity for enciphering auxiliary data is less than that of the above two issues.
The difference between commercial scrambling and enciphering is illustrated by applying each process to the word SENSITIVE, for example.
Enciphering is usually done at the level of individual characters or electrical (binary) bits of information where substitution completely alters the information.
Finally, for the scheme to resist both known-plaintext and chosen ciphertext attacks, it is suggested to refresh the keystream used in the enciphering phase per communication session and to keep the transformation matrix used in the FFCT phase as a shared secret between the communicating parties.
Soon it will be impossible to separate the radio from the enciphering software.
To guard their privacy, they invented a method of enciphering their transmissions.
The advocates of jamming, on the other hand, point out that today's sophisticated enciphering techniques, low probabilities of intercept and other forms of electronic counter-countermeasures, make the question moot.
We will illustrate the idea of using such functions by enciphering blocks of 64 bits.
On the other hand, the advocates of jamming point out that today's sophisticated enciphering techniques and low probability of intercept (LPI) transmission make the question moot.
(4) permitting detection but denying understanding - enciphering.