encomium


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encomium

a formal expression of praise; eulogy; panegyric
References in periodicals archive ?
The strategy at this point, the closing section of the speech, is relevant to the Platonic doctrines which Dio rehearsed earlier and which seemed, initially, to present an obstruction to the encomium.
Barnfield's "Encomium," when it is thought about at all, is thought about in connection with the genre of the paradoxical encomium as outlined by Henry Knight Miller in 1956.
In expressing their thoughts in the playful form of the mock encomium, they remind us nonetheless of the comedy of the whole business.
Loosely modeled on the classical paradoxical encomium, the Bernesque capitolo is known for its comic realism, expressiveness, sexual double entendres, and parodic qualities.
Finucci provides some useful observations on Bianca Capello in her introduction, but little else in the way of detail to prepare readers for the length and intensity of the encomium of Venice.
The theoretical framework for the chapter on "the doxology of the self-portrait," which defines this term both as an encomium and as the "radiance and luminosity" (93) of reason and knowledge that permeates both "L'apologie de Raymond Sebond" and Rembrandt's Self-Portrait as the Apostle Paul, is brilliantly conceived, highlighting the general character of Small's text.
See Cardano, Encomium podagrae, 1:221-25 and Commentarii in Aphorismos Hippocratis 1.
They fit well together as a whole as something of an encomium to the city.
com and has a nice picture of the bloke himself plus the official encomium on his manifest talents but no images.
Given the sort of press Moment has been getting, Reilly's encomium may be correct.
Thus addressed, its description falls within the generic confines of the encomium.
Willingham (modern foreign languages, Baylor University) presents chapters on the life of Esquivel, a survey of literary criticism of her work and an encomium from her friend Elenea Poniatowska Amor, before the essays on individual books.