encumbrance


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encumbrance

, incumbrance
Law a burden or charge upon property, such as a mortgage or lien

encumbrance

A restriction on the use of real property, or an obligation to make a payment which is secured by real property and which does not prevent its conveyance.
References in periodicals archive ?
The elimination or transfer of mortgages and or other encumbrances will take place within 45 days of a notice sent out to affected parties, who have the right to appeal.
If so, the size of the encumbrance was estimated from assessor maps.
49) The court held that while a zoning ordinance such as this may affect the marketability of the property, it is not such an encumbrance as can be used to relieve the purchaser of the obligation to complete the contract.
Unlike its competitors, Fund-Plus offers an integrated package, which includes purchase order and encumbrance, accounts payable, budget reporting, check reconciliation and a data transfer program called Lynx.
Encumbrances outstanding (lapsed) (section 1700, paragraph .
Simply put, a broker's lien is a property right that imposes a charge or an encumbrance upon property for the amount of commissions owed to the broker.
Absent an encumbrance, a contribution of property would not be prohibited.
By helping to set standards for electronic prescribing, we can progressively alleviate the encumbrance felt by long-term care and pharmacy staff.
Products and services of Commerce Title and affiliates include title insurance policies, title reports, settlement closings, ownership and encumbrance searches, uniform commercial code searches, environmental deed services, 1031 exchanges, home improvement reports, full appraisals, automated valuation model (AVM) appraisals, appraisal reviews, property information reports, and pre-foreclosure information reports.
To the best of knowledge and information of the authorized officer, there is no encumbrance on the properties.
jurisdiction loans are secured by the same domestic assets: accounts receivable -- not securitized, inventories, stocks of subsidiaries, intangibles (trademarks/brand names), guarantees by subsidiaries, and real property, but only to the extent, in the case of the latter, that their encumbrance does not violate the indentures of outstanding bonds or trigger an obligation to equally and ratably secure bonds.
The rationale behind this position, as articulated by the federal district court for the District of New Jersey, is that expanding the definition of encumbrance to title to include environmental conditions will create uncertainty and confusion in the law of conveyance and title insurance, since a title search would not have disclosed the violation.