encystment

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encystment

[en′sist·mənt]
(biology)
The process of forming or becoming enclosed in a cyst or capsule.
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The disease occurs when larvae of the pork tapeworm, Taenia solium, encyst in the human brain; this process causes a broad range of neurologic signs and symptoms, including seizures, headache, obstructive hydrocephalus, encephalitis, stroke, and cognitive and other mental health disorders (3,4).
Sporocysts and two generations of rediae develop producing cercariae that eventually encyst in fishes or amphibians (second intermediate hosts).
After release from the molluscan host, cercariae of Glypthelmins quieta and Megalodiscus temperatus penetrate the skin of anurans and encyst beneath the epidennis.
In adult dogs, L2 do not always complete the cycle described above but encyst in various tissues of their host for a long period of time.
This larva must attach and encyst on a host fish where it transforms into a juvenile mussel, which is released to complete its life cycle as a free-living organism.
The parasites encyst and lay their fertilized eggs within the lung of the host, to be passed enterically or via bronchial secretions.
When intermediate hosts, such as rodents or other small mammals, ingest ova, larvae hatch, migrate to the viscera, encyst, and molt several times (3).
Once the glochidia are mature, the female releases them into the water, where they must attach and encyst on the gills, fins or epidermis of a suitable host fish for metamorphosis to the juvenile stage.
Free-swimming cercariae exit the snail and attach to aquatic vegetation, where they encyst as metacercariae.
It is also possible that the cercariae were induced to encyst before penetrating tissue by the oyster's humoral defense mechanisms.
The end product of this reproductive process in molluscan hosts was free-swimming larvae, the cercariae, which left snail hosts to infect the next hosts in their respective life cycles, or to encyst upon appropriate substrates.
After this outbreak, laboratory investigations found that propylene glycol may cause Acanthamoeba trophozoites to encyst, thereby making them resistant to disinfection (12,13).