end-bearing pile

end-bearing pile

[′end ‚ber·iŋ ‚pīl]
(civil engineering)
A bearing pile that is driven down to hard ground so that it carries the full load at its point. Also known as a point-bearing pile.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

end-bearing pile

A pile principally supported at its toe (point), which rests on or is embedded in a bearing stratum.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In previous researches, to avert the aggravation of pile penetration during embankment filling, end-bearing piles such as CFG piles were not recommended to reinforce the soils with low shear strength.
In the first case, piles have a 10 m length and do not reach the hard Flash layer (floating piles); in the second case, the piles length is 11 m, and they reach the hard soil (end-bearing piles).
4 in Figure 6(a)), suggests that hypothesis 2 (end-bearing piles) would be the more realistic one.
The ultimate amount of the load, which can be carried by the pile shaft, determines the type of pile as piles are classified according to their load-transfer mechanism (friction piles and end-bearing piles).
"Seismic response of end-bearing piles," Journal of Geotechnical Engineering Division, ASCE, Vol.
These piles support the tower by the friction between the soil and the timber, but are not end-bearing piles so it was important to prevent excessive differential settlement.