care

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CARE

(Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere), nonprofit, nonsectarian federation of agencies devoted to channeling relief and self-help materials to needy people in foreign countries. Organized in the United States (1945) to help war-ravaged Europe, CARE soon expanded its program to include developing nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Famous for its "CARE packages" of food and other necessities, CARE in now also involved in population, health care, land management, and small economic activity. It is now an international organization with 10 member countries and headquarters in Brussels.

care

  1. the work involved in supporting people who, because of physical frailty chronic illness or other forms of incapacity and disability, are incapable of leading an autonomous existence.
  2. other kinds of carework, e.g. in child-rearing (see CHILD CARE) and DOMESTIC LABOUR. This should be distinguished from care in sense 1.
Care in sense 1 operates over a wide range of social relations. A clear dividing line can be drawn between formal and informal care (see Abrams, 1978) as it exists in contemporary industrial societies. Formal care refers to services provided by agents of organization (statutory, voluntary and/or private) to people within clearly defined categories of need. Informal care is personally directed towards certain people who have a social relationship with their carer - usually a family member, and most often a spouse (Parker, 1993), or female relative.

Feminist sociologists (see also FEMINISM) have had a major impact on the understanding of care and caring relationships. They have argued that caring is ‘a gendered concept’ and that women constitute the majority of carers both informally, in the private sphere, and as low-paid care workers (‘care assistants’) in the formal sector (Finch and Groves, 1982; Ungerson, 1987; Lewis and Meredith, 1988). Studies of caring have examined the complex reasons why women care and the particular problems and difficulties they face. Social policies involving decarceration and COMMUNITY CARE, the decline of neighbour-hood and COMMUNITY associated with increasing SOCIAL (and geographical) MOBILITY, have placed an increasing burden on individual women carers. There is some evidence that women are reluctant to enter caring relationships with female relatives but lack viable alternatives (Cotterill, 1994). Recent research using data from the 1980 British General Household Survey has also pointed to the significant contribution made by male carers, particularly men who care for their wives (Arber and Gilbert, 1989).

care, custody, and control

Describes a standard exclusion in liability insurance policies. Under this exclusion, the liability insurance does not apply to damage to property in the care or custody of the insured, or to damage to property over which the insured is for any purpose exercising physical control.

CARE

agency devoted to channeling relief to needy people abroad. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 456]

care

in (or into) care Social welfare made the legal responsibility of a local authority by order of a court
References in periodicals archive ?
O'Toole continued, "Working with Aetna, one of the nation's leading and most respected managed care organizations, will ensure that VITAS can continue to meet the ever-increasing demand for quality, compassionate, responsive end-of-life care from those who seek to maximize quality of life when they have a limited time to live.
By bringing together local nursing facilities, and local and national resources, we could focus on collaboratively overcoming some of the barriers to good end-of-life care," said Nicole Fowler, PELC project coordinator and administrator for the Section of Palliative Care and Medical Ethics at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.
Don Gerhardt, CEO of Medical Alley states, "Having Patricia on board to lead the improvement effort for end-of-life care is extremely important to our provider member organizations and to Minnesota overall.
The heartbreaking truth is that this high quality, optimal end-of-life care is available in most parts of America, but it's not being used until patients are at death's door.
Deputy Minister Vaughan Gething said: "We want to focus on delivering high quality end-of-life care based on the individual's needs and not over-medicalising care which can compromise quality of remaining life.
The dementia support workers will assist carers at various homes in Walsall to help them use evidence based tools such as the Abbey pain scale - to help the homes become more dementia friendly and ensure that end-of-life care plans are tailored for each person.
A new report published by the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman claims end-of-life care could be improved for up to 355,000 people a year and highlights cases where people's suffering could have been avoided or eased with the right care.
It will enhance the way end-of-life care is delivered in many organizations around the country.
age, health workers and organizations are seeing the value of educating Americans on the need for end-of-life care plans.
Like Gawande, Volandes's ability to share his own personal experience with his father's decisions around end-of-life care drives home the stories of patients like a poetry professor who, when she learned her brain tumor was inoperable, was able to make arrangements to die at home instead of in a hospital.
Between February 20 and May 27, The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) held a national dialogue on end-of-life care in Canada that included 5 events and an opportunity for input from CMA members and Canadians in general.
A NEW partnership has been formed to find out what palliative and end-of-life care research is important to people who are likely to be within the last years of life.