endemic

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endemic

an endemic disease or plant

endemic

[en′dem·ik]
(medicine)
Peculiar to a certain region, specifically referring to a disease which occurs more or less constantly in any locality.
References in periodicals archive ?
Haematological findings and endemicity of malaria in Gadap region.
Hepatitis B virus genotypes from European origin explains the high endemicity found in some areas from southern Brazil.
High prevalence of typhoidal Salmonella enterica serovars excreting food handlers in Karachi-Pakistan: a probable factor for regional typhoid endemicity.
Endemicity analysis, parsimony and biotic elements: a formal comparison using hypothetical distributions.
Location One location one site One location multiple sites Multiple locations multiple sites Sampling Purposive Sampling--Selecting sample based on known high leprosy endemicity Random Sampling--Selecting sample by random Mass screening--Whole of population screening i.
The importance is clearly magnified for patients in tropical areas, which have high endemicity of parasitic infections.
The high TB endemicity in Brazilian prisons is not specific to the state of Rio de Janeiro.
The MOH's statistical records indicate a total of 20,034 reported clinical cases in Saudi Arabia, between 2004 and 2013, mostly in the cities of Makkah and Jeddah, and along the Western coast of the country, confirming the endemicity and yearly occurrence of dengue, he added.
tuberculosis isolates from Shanghai (low TB endemic region) and Chongqing (high TB endemic region) found that mutations conferring drug resistance to INH and RIF were more diversified in the region of low TB endemicity than in the region of high TB endemicity.
In Venezuela and other Latin-American countries, where endemicity is high for other arboviruses such as dengue and chikungunya, health authorities should strengthen their surveillance systems to detect early and timely introduction of ZIKV and refine diagnostic methods to confirm the infection rate; however, the high incidence of cases due those viral agents reflects weakened and poorly timed insensitive monitoring systems, as well as, poor vector control measures, arising the questions: will this arbovirus pop in our country, will it set as the other as endemicepidemic and lead to alter their clinical behavior and severity of the disease?
Besides mosquitogenic conditions in tribal areas, poor knowledge and attitude toward the disease is also one of the reasons for maintaining high endemicity in some areas.
2 Although the causative bacterium was first described 132 years ago, most typhoid patients do not have access to reliable laboratory diagnosis, since the appropriate facilities and techniques usually still do not exist in economically poor areas of endemicity.