endocarp

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endocarp

[′en·dō‚kärp]
(botany)
The inner layer of the wall of a fruit or pericarp.
References in periodicals archive ?
2009) with additional characters, of longitudinal grooves, mesocarp furrows, fibers in mesocarp, endocarp grooves, and number of seeds, coded by the examination of herbarium material and fossil specimens (Table 3).
One seeded ovoid drupe, exocarp and mesocarp fused and indistinguishable one from another; three external longitudinal grooves delimiting three valves, endocarp thin, not sculptured; apical stigmatic remains; one locule, seed deltoid; endosperm homogeneous and ruminate; apical germination pore and basal hilum.
2f); while the endocarp is thin and unsculptured (Fig.
Although Tripylocarpa lacks the characteristic 3 or more well developed endocarp pores typical of tribe Cocoseae, the suite of anatomical and morphological characters point to an affinity with Cocoseae.
weddellianum, the exo/mesocarp dehisces at maturity along the grooves exposing the endocarp and releasing the seed.
The predominance of endocarps at the studied archaeological sites is probably the result of both cultural and environmental conditions.
Although the thick and hard endocarps of this species are easily preserved, they are not frequent at the archaeological sites reviewed.
Two useful palms with woody endocarps are noteworthy, because they have not been recorded at archaeological sites: the coconut (Cocos nucifera), and the coco cumbe (Parajubaea cocoides).
Species Remains Arocomia aculeata Carbonized endocarps (Jacq.
All three types of Nyssa endocarp sculpture (ridged with sunken bundles, ridged with raised bundles, and smooth) are known already in the Eocene of Europe and North America, indicating that considerable diversification had already occurred in the genus by the mid-Eocene.
Endocarp remains of Alangiaceae, Cornaceae and Nyssaceae in Japan.