endocrine gland


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Related to endocrine gland: pituitary gland

endocrine gland

Med any of the glands that secrete hormones directly into the bloodstream, including the pituitary, pineal, thyroid, parathyroid, adrenal, testes, ovaries, and the pancreatic islets of Langerhans
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

endocrine gland

[′en·də·krən ‚gland]
(physiology)
A ductless structure whose secretion (hormone) is passed into adjacent tissue and then to the bloodstream either directly or by way of the lymphatics. Also known as ductless gland.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ribatti, "Endocrine gland derived-VEGF is down-regulated in human pituitary adenoma," Anticancer Research, vol.
The endocrine system constitutes endocrine glands which are situated in different part of body.
Endocrinology is the medical super speciality dealing with the endocrine system, the specific secretions of the endocrine glands called hormones and the diseases involving them.
Harrower, a pioneering researcher of oral glandulars, believed glandulars were effective because endocrine glands experienced something he referred to as "hormone hunger." (30) Harrower wrote:
The pituitary gland is mentioned here because it is a prime regulator of adrenal secretions, as well as providing regulatory functions for many other endocrine glands.
Throughout the chapters the editors comprehensively focus on the specific minute details of physiology, function, and specific diseases affecting each endocrine gland. The discussion goes into great detail, which will also not endear the editors to office-based physicians.
The corpus luteum is a transient endocrine gland which forms from the ovulated ovarian follicle and is critical for normal reproduction because it is the primary source of the progestational hormones such as progesterone.
In addition, the age at which FMEN1 can begin to cause endocrine gland overfunction can differ strikingly from one family member to another.
T4 in all four thalassemic groups had a significant positive correlation with hemoglobin (P13 years female had a significant positive correlation with BMI, ferritin and hemoglobin (P1000 ng/ml lead to iron overload in various organ like heart, liver and endocrine gland (Olivieri and Brittenham, 1997; Vichinsky, 2001).
Probably, the most important controversy in this field is the terminology itself: whether accidental discovery of a mass in an endocrine gland should be called incidentaloma or the term should be restricted.
Endocrine disorders were classified according to the 10th revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10) as follows: (1) thyroid gland and thyroid hormone abnormalities, (2) disorders of the pancreas, insulin, and glucagon, (3) parathyroid gland disorders, (4) disorders of the pituitary gland, (5) disorders of the adrenal gland, (6) disorders of the gonads, and (7) other disorders of the endocrine gland. Clinical diagnoses were made by history taking and physical examination followed by laboratory and radiological studies as indicated.
This good quality blood reaches the endocrine gland, keeping them in good working order.