endogamy

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endogamy

(ĕndŏg`əmē): see marriagemarriage,
socially sanctioned union that reproduces the family. In all societies the choice of partners is generally guided by rules of exogamy (the obligation to marry outside a group); some societies also have rules of endogamy (the obligation to marry within a group).
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endogamy

a rule prescribing marriage within a given social group. The group may belong to a LINEAGE, CASTE, CLASS, ethnic affiliation, or other type of social classification. The converse of endogamy is EXOGAMY. Since all marriage systems are both endogamous and exogamous, it is necessary to specify in detail the prescribed and the proscribed groups.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Endogamy

 

a custom prescribing marriage within a certain social group, such as a tribe, caste, or clan.

In primitive society the tribe was endogamous, and the clan was exogamous (seeEXOGAMY). During the period of the decay of primitive communal relations, the clan or, more frequently, intraclan groups (patronymic groups) among the Malagasy, part of the Bantu, the Arabs, the Uzbeks, the Tuareg, and other peoples became endogamous in an attempt to keep property among close relatives. Ortho-cousin marriages between the children of, for example, cousins and second cousins were arranged in the father’s line and, less frequently, in the mother’s line. Caste endogamy characterizes the castes of India.

REFERENCES

Engels, F. Proiskhozhdenie sem’i, chastnoi sobstvennosti i qosudarstva. In K. Marx and F. Engels, Soch., 2nd ed., vol. 21.
Shternberg, L. Ia. Sem’ia i rod u narodov Severo-Vostochnoi Azii. Leningrad, 1933.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

endogamy

[en′däg·ə·mē]
(biology)
Sexual reproduction between organisms which are closely related.
(botany)
Pollination of a flower by another flower of the same plant.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The aim of this study was to evaluate different mating strategies among endogamic strains to create F1 hybrid populations of mice, minimising the effect of the inbreeding depression in somatic development and embryo production.
Young females from the endogamic strains Swiss, CBA and C57B1/6, 50 days old, were divided in inter- and intra-lineages mating, in a total of nine experimental arrangements (paternal x maternal): Group 1, Swiss x Swiss; Group 2, Swiss x C57B1/6; Group 3, Swiss x CBA; Group 4, C57Bl/6 x C57B1/6; Group 5, C57B1/6 x Swiss; Group 6, C57Bl/6 x CBA; Group 7, CBA x CBA; Group 8, CBA x Swiss; e Group 9, CBA x C57B1/6.
The offspring from the endogamic Swiss strain was larger and heavier (P < 0.05) than those born from C57B1/6 and CBA, which did not differ from each other (P < 0.05).
The aim of this work was to evaluate different mate strategies among endogamic strains for the production of F1 mice populations.
But this shift was only relative, as Molho emphasizes continuity rather than change: the ruling class (and the elite within it) had had substantially the same personnel and the same endogamic marital policies already in 1400.
The fourth set of experiments involved the endogamic and prima control populations (see Materials and Methods).
Table 2 summarizes the results of the mating tests involving the control populations (ancestral, endogamic, and prima; see Materials and Methods).
If this were correct, ethological isolation would be also expected between inbred populations, such as the "prima" (F > 0.9; Table 1) and "endogamic" (F > 0.5) populations in our experiment, or the ones in Powell (1978) and Powell and Morton (1979), which is not the case.
Habitat fragmentation may also divide one large population into subpopulations located in small areas, making them more vulnerable to endogamic depression, genetic changes, and increasing their chance of extinction.
Many studies indicate that Costa Rica's populations, specially those of the central region, are highly endogamic (Melendez 1982, Stone 1982, Saborio 1993, Escamilla et al.