endogamy


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endogamy

(ĕndŏg`əmē): see marriagemarriage,
socially sanctioned union that reproduces the family. In all societies the choice of partners is generally guided by rules of exogamy (the obligation to marry outside a group); some societies also have rules of endogamy (the obligation to marry within a group).
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endogamy

a rule prescribing marriage within a given social group. The group may belong to a LINEAGE, CASTE, CLASS, ethnic affiliation, or other type of social classification. The converse of endogamy is EXOGAMY. Since all marriage systems are both endogamous and exogamous, it is necessary to specify in detail the prescribed and the proscribed groups.

Endogamy

 

a custom prescribing marriage within a certain social group, such as a tribe, caste, or clan.

In primitive society the tribe was endogamous, and the clan was exogamous (seeEXOGAMY). During the period of the decay of primitive communal relations, the clan or, more frequently, intraclan groups (patronymic groups) among the Malagasy, part of the Bantu, the Arabs, the Uzbeks, the Tuareg, and other peoples became endogamous in an attempt to keep property among close relatives. Ortho-cousin marriages between the children of, for example, cousins and second cousins were arranged in the father’s line and, less frequently, in the mother’s line. Caste endogamy characterizes the castes of India.

REFERENCES

Engels, F. Proiskhozhdenie sem’i, chastnoi sobstvennosti i qosudarstva. In K. Marx and F. Engels, Soch., 2nd ed., vol. 21.
Shternberg, L. Ia. Sem’ia i rod u narodov Severo-Vostochnoi Azii. Leningrad, 1933.

endogamy

[en′däg·ə·mē]
(biology)
Sexual reproduction between organisms which are closely related.
(botany)
Pollination of a flower by another flower of the same plant.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the other hand, the more or less systematic concentration of the remnants of decimated populations around government settlements and in missions may have had an opposite effect, bringing about, for example, a higher rate of local endogamy than existed previously.
In many ways, endogamy is usual in our own society.
Some studies conducted in the Arab and Islamic world showed that family endogamy is still a very important feature of alliances contracted further in Jordan, Palestine, Syria, Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Kurdistan, Iran, Pakistan, Egypt, Sudan, Lebanon and North Africa (Tunisia, Morocco and Algeria) [9,10,11,12,13,1].
Using the insights provided by Wong (2003) and Gullickson (2006) in their papers on racial intermarriage, I argue that the mechanisms through which human capital affects ethnic endogamy fall into three main categories.
characterized by ecological concentration and segregation in definite areas of habitat, strict endogamy, and a body of differentiating traits (including folk dialect [Low German] and church language [High German]), certain folkways, and a consciousness of kind and a common descent.
Among the topics are grassroots peace initiatives between the Nuer and Dinka of South Sudan, endogamy and alliance in northern Sudan, the rise and decline of lorry driving in the Fallata migrant community of Maiurno on the Blue Nile, conflict and identity politics in Anywaa-Nuer relations in Gambela in western Ethiopia, and changing identifications among the Pari refugees in Kakuma.
41) The socioeconomic network of Willem Moreel was an exponent of the trade endogamy common in the Low Countries, because late medieval Bruges merchants and tradesmen married within their social class, and even within their trade.
Thus endogamy in the Indigenous community is closely associated with non-metropolitan residential location and low income.
5) The caste systems, although outlawed in 1947 with Indian independence, remains a powerful, de facto, traditional, hereditary systems of social classification, based on endogamy, occupation, economic status, and ethnicity.
The marriage patterns in these societies reflected this concept of ownership with exogamy being practiced in the low intensity agricultural situation and endogamy in the more-intensified context (Goody 1974).
On both sides of this border, Punjabis share a history and language, as well as numerous features of everyday life such as kinship structures, family values, and notions of gender, adherence to caste endogamy, folk practices and traditions, material and popular cultures, and a predominantly rural economy.
The smaller pool of men may explain why Galegas married at the fairly late age of twenty-five, the widespread practice of endogamy (to first cousins, rather than brothers, as Strabo asserted), as well as the fact that many women never married at all.