endolithic


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endolithic

[¦en·də¦lith·ik]
(ecology)
Living within rocks, as certain algae and coral.
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Moreover, the precipitation of overgrowths likely occurred very rapidly because they formed prior to boring by endolithic organisms.
Effects of elevated pCO, on epilithic and endolithic metabolism of reef carbonates.
My goal with this proposal is to establish a truly interdisciplinary expertise in the study of endolithic cyanobacteria by joining the skills and tools of the Garcia-Pichel lab (ASU-USA) and Biogeosciences lab (uB-France).
Calcification of exposed filaments of endolithic algae, micrite envelope formation and sediment production.
Taxa used in quantitative analysis, 1) Epizoite on bigger hydroid colonies, 2) ecto-parasites on the hydroid Amphisbetia operculata, 3) endolithic organisms inhabiting BAS; 4) endobiont in the the gorgonean Tripalea clavaria, 5) specimens inhabiting fine sediments accumulated in cavities and crevices.
Among the topics are the distribution of microorganisms on ancient wall paintings as related to associated faunal elements, aerobiological research and problems in libraries, a laboratory investigation of the microbial degradation of silk, fungal growth on synthetic cloth from Apollo spacesuits, fungal bioturbation paths in a compact disk, microbial deterioration found in archaeological wood from different environments, epilithic and endolithic bacterial communities in limestone from a Maya archaeological site, and advantages of using microbial technology instead of conventional chemical technology to remove black crusts from stone surfaces of historical monuments.
Pyrenodesmia) in Italy shared similar lineages of Trebouxia (also shared with Lecanora rupicola) possibly associated with their spore reproduction and endolithic habit but a sorediate species (C.
an ancient music they try to recall because, although they can't quite hear the tune, they know if they could sing it that even their own wild rage and lust and death terrors would seem as beautiful as the endolithic algae that releases nitrogen into rocks so that junipers can milk them.
In contrast to possible worm borings in shells, Lower Ordovician endolithic microborings of algal, fungal, and sponge origin are well known from northern Poland (Podhalanska 1984), and the Siljan District of Sweden (Hessland 1949; Lindstrom 1979).
A few examples are endolithic algae living within interstices of rocks; mummified seals that crawled inland from the sea thousands of years ago to meet death upvalley; ice-covered lakes that are stratified by temperature and salinity (one of the lakes--Don Juan Pond--is so saline that it doesn't freeze in winter); and glacier-carved valleys once inundated by the sea.
They exist as mats, scums, epilithic, chasmolithic, endolithic, or epibiotic communities.