duct

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duct

1. any bodily passage, esp one conveying secretions or excretions
2. a narrow tubular cavity in plants, often containing resin or some other substance
3. a channel or pipe carrying electric cable or wires
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Duct

A nonmetallic or metallic tube for housing wires or cables, may be underground or embedded in concrete floor slabs; a duct usually fabricated of metal, used to transfer air from one location to another.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

duct

[dəkt]
(anatomy)
An enclosed tubular channel for conducting a glandular secretion or other body fluid.
(communications)
An enclosed runway for cables.
(geophysics)
The space between two air layers, or between an air layer and the earth's surface, in which microwave beams are trapped in ducting. Also known as radio duct; tropospheric duct.
(mechanical engineering)
A fluid flow passage which may range from a few inches in diameter to many feet in rectangular cross section, usually constructed of galvanized steel, aluminum, or copper, through which air flows in a ventilation system or to a compressor, supercharger, or other equipment at speeds ranging to thousands of feet per minute.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

duct

1. ,See air duct.
2. In electric systems, a metallic or nonmetallic tube, (usually circular, oval, rectangular, or octagonal) for housing wires or cables; may be underground or embedded in concrete floor slabs.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

duct

A thin-wall tube installed in aircraft air-conditioning and heating systems to carry heated or cooled air for distribution to various aircraft locations.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Our findings and those of temporal bone histologic studies support the concept that even microscopic violation of the endolymphatic duct can potentially incite hydrops.
Meniere's symptoms resulting from bilateral otosclerotic occlusion of the endolymphatic duct: An analysis of a causal relationship between otosclerosis and Meniere's disease.
In this patient, the resultant hemodynamic alteration occurring in the left jugular bulb may have disturbed the venous drainage of the endolymphatic duct and/or sac, thereby producing endolymphatic hydrops.
In four patients, a device with a capillary tube (Arenberg's inner ear valve or Austin's endolymph dispersement drain) was inserted into the endolymphatic duct. Four other patients had their endolymphatic sac drained by a simple incision, and one patient underwent decompression alone.
The aqueduct contains the endolymphatic duct, which enlarges and ends blindly in the endolymphatic sac on the posterior surface of the petrous bone.