endomorph

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Related to endomorphic: mesomorphic

endomorph

[′en·də‚mȯrf]
(psychology)
A somatotype suggested by W.H. Sheldon to describe a person with a rounded physique; associated with viscerotonia.
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To determine whether mass media play a role in the tendency to derogate non-ideal bodies, one must examine the types of men that are over- and underrepresented in film and the ways in which ectomorphic, mesomorphic, and endomorphic characters are portrayed.
The tool portrayed male images from ectomorphic bodies to endomorphic bodies.
These five factors are male gender, younger age, endomorphic body type in women, no prior hysterectomy, and--most important by far--a willingness to try the sedation-free procedure with the assurance that at any point during the colonoscopy the patients would immediately receive sedation should they change their minds, explained Dr.
But--let me say this politely--those with a middle-age spread all the way around the axis of the body present more, not less, difficulty in concealment than more endomorphic humans.
Seated at my glum table in Hotel-land (one of the very few places where the Full English is still commonly encountered), I was surrounded by endomorphic businessmen dressed in plastic suits (blistered by halitosis fumes), who were eagerly consuming theirs, presumably in preparation for their third coronary.
Eurasians are more likely to have the endomorphic physique of the best strength athletes.
The results showed that those skaters who perceived themselves as endomorphic (i.
Breaking down his client list into three specific body types--ectomorphic, endomorphic and mesomorphic--Isaacson gives the best advice for each category:
Zaftig yet svelte, an endomorphic Venus on a Bloomingdale's halfshell.
Compared to individuals with endomorphic and mesomorphic body types, ectomorphic individuals were rated most positively and considered to be the most sexually appealing (Spillman & Everington, 1989).