endorphin


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endorphin

any of a class of polypeptides, including enkephalin, occurring naturally in the brain, that bind to pain receptors and so block pain sensation
References in periodicals archive ?
A: Endorphins are proteins produced by your cells (mostly in your nervous system) that act like narcotics to relieve pain and stress.
This UV light-seeking behavior seemed to hinge on endorphins: When people's endorphins were blocked with a different drug called naltrexone, they no longer distinguished between the real and fake tanning beds, a failure that suggests they had become immune to the rewards of UV light.
Contact: Eric Jenican Endorphin Warrior Email http://www.
The discovery of the precise locations in the brain where endorphins are released provides a possible target for the development of more effective drugs for the treatment of alcohol abuse, said senior author Howard L.
Endorphin allows animators to direct scenes in real-time in a way they have never been able to do before.
Although there were no further problems at the 25-mg dose, Feldman says these results suggest that frequent tanners suffer some degree of dependency on endorphins.
To further understand the role of the endorphin messenger neurohormone in relation to exercise, look at quality and quantity of exercise, particularly as found in animal studies.
During uncontrollable trauma, an increase in endogenous opioids (endorphins) helps to numb the pain of the trauma Following the trauma, however, a rebound endorphin withdrawal can contribute to the symptoms of emotional distress observed after a traumatic event as well as an increased desire to drink alcohol.
It says that not only does tanning lead to browning of skin but also leads to the release of feel-good chemicals called endorphins which act like heroin and other opiates.
Working out is more than just physical," said Endorphin Warrior founder, Eric Jenican.
The findings of the study led by researchers at the Ernest Gallo Clinic and Research Center at the University of California, San Francisco marks the first time that endorphin release in the nucleus accumbens and orbitofrontal cortex in response to alcohol consumption has been directly observed in humans.
Neither is it simply a case of the endorphin rush that follows exercise giving us a temporary high.