endorser


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endorser

[en′dȯr·sər]
(computer science)
A special feature available on most magnetic-ink character-recognition readers that imprints a bank's endorsement on successful document reading.
(graphic arts)
A camera attachment that stamps documents as they are filmed.
References in periodicals archive ?
For advertisers, this data from 4C provides a better way to measure the impact endorsers can have on social media and how fans interact with brands via social channels.
For example, Roobina Ohanian, in 1991, in his article on "matchup hypotheses," explained that the core values of the brand must align with those of the endorser.
Malaika has been the celebrity endorser for the charity project in India for the past few years
I am very excited to be part of this game changing product and technology solution for athletes and other celebrities who want to more effectively connect with their fans and at the same time enhance their long and short-term market value as endorsers.
John Antil and Matthew Robinson, both faculty members in the Alfred Lerner College of Business and Economics, said advertisers' tactics are creating a cycle of failure for female athlete endorsers.
They're meeting local people without putting themselves in harm's way on the ballot, and the people who win with their help might be grateful - and helpful - later on, when this year's endorsers are looking for allies.
An early definition of celebrity endorser is provided by Friedman and his associates (1976): "The celebrity is known to the public for his accomplishments in areas unrelated to the product class endorsed" (p.
Richard Gordon, a presidential candidate, analysed Pacquiao's predicament as a politician and a public endorser.
The company has reported that celebrity endorser, Trishelle Cannatella, has won the USD1,000 + USD70 Texas Hold'em tournament.
To explain their success at such prediction requires crediting the endorsers with some capacity--some talent, method, or Barnes's preference, background beliefs--to generate true theories.
In a tourism context, close links between the celebrity and the endorsed destination may exist, especially when the endorser is a member of the tourism industry.
On occasion, the endorser is valuable because of his or her specific expertise.