antagonist

(redirected from endothelin-receptor antagonist)
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antagonist

1. any muscle that opposes the action of another
2. a drug that counteracts the effects of another drug

antagonist

[an′tag·ə‚nist]
(biochemistry)
A molecule that bears sufficient structural similarity to a second molecule to compete with that molecule for binding sites on a third molecule.
(pharmacology)
A drug or other chemical substance capable of reducing the physiological activity of another chemical substance; refers especially to a drug that opposes the action of a drug or other chemical substance on the nervous system by combining with and blocking the nerve receptor.
(physiology)
A muscle that contracts with, and limits the action of, another muscle, called an agonist, with which it is paired.
References in periodicals archive ?
While the guidelines recommend against targeted therapies for RHC-confirmed PH, a trial of either a prostanoid or an endothelin-receptor antagonist is recommended for patients with confirmed PH and elevated pulmonary vascular resistance, normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and related symptoms.
Channick RN, Simonneau G, Sitbon O, et al: Effects of the dual endothelin-receptor antagonist bosentan in patients with pulmonary hypertension: A randomised placebo-controlled study.
1) Channick, RN, Simonneau G, Sitbon O, et al, Effects of the dual endothelin-receptor antagonist bosentan in patients with pulmonary hypertension: a randomised placebo-controlled study.

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