endotrophic


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endotrophic

[¦en·də¦trä·fik]
(biology)
Obtaining nourishment from within; applied to certain parasitic fungi that live in the root cortex of the host plant.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hashimoto, "Carbon dioxide induces endotrophic germ tube formation in Candida albicans," Canadian Journal of Microbiology, vol.
Considering the highest density tested (400 sea urchins/[m.sup.2]), assuming a 1:1 sex ratio, and an average spawning of 500 x [10.sup.3] eggs, 100 females stocked in 1 400-L tank will produce 50 x [10.sup.6] eggs in 5 mo, and, due to high fertilization rates, a similar amount of endotrophic larvae is expected.
Fatty acid nutritional quality of sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus (Lamarck 1816) eggs and endotrophic larvae: relevance for feeding of marine larval fish.
The larval esophagus and intestine regressed in turn, and the larva then entered an endotrophic period, being deprived of both mouth and anus.
During the first period, when the larva is endotrophic, we observed a faster growth of the posterolateral rods compared to body length.
In echinoids the perimetamorphic period starts at larval competence, includes metamorphosis and the endotrophic postlarval development, and stops at the acquisition of juvenile exotrophy.
The roots have endotrophic mycorrhizae (Lodge, 1996; Calderon, 1993, in Myster & Walker, 1997; not ectotrophic mycorrhizae, as reported by Edmisten [1970]).