Enemy

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Enemy

Amalekites
Israel’s hereditary foe and symbol of perpetual hatred. [Jew. Hist.: Wigoder, 24]
Antichrist
principal antagonist of Christ. [Christianity: NCE, 117]
Armilus
legendary name of anti-Messiah. [Judaism: Wigoder, 41]
Satan
also called the Adversary or the Devil. [Christianity: Misc.]
References in classic literature ?
Men of Helium for the Prince of Helium against all his enemies," it read.
Wherever messages could be passed between us that could not be intercepted by our enemies I passed the word that all our vessels were to withdraw from the fight as rapidly as possible, taking a position to the west and south of the combatants.
Do as I tell you," he urged, "and I will lead you to victory over these enemies of yours.
If, Socrates, we are to be guided at all by the analogy of the preceding instances, then justice is the art which gives good to friends and evil to enemies.
And who is best able to do good to his friends and evil to his enemies in time of sickness?
And so, you and Homer and Simonides are agreed that justice is an art of theft; to be practised however `for the good of friends and for the harm of enemies,'--that was what you were saying?
Well, there is another question: By friends and enemies do we mean those who are so really, or only in seeming?
Ye shall only have enemies to be hated, but not enemies to be despised.
When the Pawnees observed the rush of their enemies, twenty warriors rode into the stream; but so soon as they perceived that the Tetons had withdrawn, they fell back to a man, leaving the young chief to the support of his own often-tried skill and well-established courage.
Do they intend to let the hair cover their heads, that their enemies shall not know where to find their scalps?
Better mounted and perhaps more ardent, the Pawnees had, however, reached the spot in sufficient numbers to force their enemies to retire.
The Siouxes had succeeded in forcing themselves into a thick growth of rank grass, where the horses of their enemies could not enter, or where, when entered, they were worse than useless.