energy density


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energy density

[′en·ər·jē ‚den·səd·ē]
(physics)
The energy per unit volume of a medium; in the case of an electric or magnetic field, the energy needed to set up the field is thought of as residing in the field.
References in periodicals archive ?
Where, Yijk = dependent variable, [mu] = average, Ei = energy density effect, Aj = AOX effect, Tk = time effect, EAij = interaction of energy and AOX, ETik = interaction of energy and time, ATjk = interaction of AOX and time, EATijk = interaction of energy and AOX and time, Cijk = error.
Given minimum energy density and power density specifications that are beyond current energy storage capabilities, systems like lightweight vehicles and handheld leaf blowers for yard cleanup often turn to fuel-burning engines.
The peak intensity can be seen to decrease rapidly as the laser energy density is increased from 0.
The children ate a consistent weight of food and so did not compensate for reductions in energy density, she added.
0 million delivery order from the Air Force to develop the next-generation of sodium borohydride-based fuel cartridge technology to address higher energy density targets for future power sources.
Papers center on research and development of techniques to increase microwave energy density and peak power in active and passive microwave devices and components spanning the range from 1 GHz up through the lower THz frequencies.
Combined effects of energy density and portion size on energy intake in women.
However, calculation of AFDW-specific energy densities (Table 1) revealed surprisingly low values: the mean AFDW-specific energy density for eggs of the 12 species was 15.
Their energy density and voltage is slightly better than Li/CFx cells, especially at cold temperatures.
The model considered differences in the energy density of the prey, and differences in digestive efficiency and the heat increment of feeding of different diets.
Strain energy density functions U, representing rubber hyperelastic behavior, can be based on polynomials of strain invariants:

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