kilocalorie

(redirected from Energy Expenditure)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms.
Related to Energy Expenditure: Basal energy expenditure, Total Energy Expenditure

kilocalorie

[′kil·ə‚kal·ə·rē]
(thermodynamics)
A unit of heat energy equal to 1000 calories. Abbreviated kcal. Also known as kilogram-calorie (kg-cal); large calorie (Cal).

kilocalorie

The heat required to raise 1 kilogram of water 1°C; the equivalent of 1000 small calories. Also see calorie.
References in periodicals archive ?
Broadly, the various techniques can be grouped as self-report, observation, heart rate monitoring (HRM), motion sensors, and doubly labelled water (DLW), which measures total energy expenditure (TEE) over time [1].
When BMI & energy expenditure per unit time were compared, there was increased energy expenditure per unit time when BMI increased in the case of step-test, this is clearly seen in GraphII.
Energy expenditure characteristics of weight lifting: 2 sets to fatigue.
The present study examined the association between the rates of accelerometer activity counts and energy expenditure during the dynamic activity of walking in persons with MS.
Among persons living in a controlled setting, calories alone account for the increase in fat; protein affected energy expenditure and storage of lean body mass, but not body fat storage.
Energy expenditure was measured using indirect calorimetry and a portable metabolic cart.
The emphasis placed on gathering measurements of energy expenditure is demonstrated by the preference for researchers to convert all raw data concerning the individual components of FITT into one single measure of metabolic equivalents (METs).
Playing active video games increases energy expenditure in children.
Bone mineral density (BMD) of the proximal femur was correlated with resting energy expenditure (REE) (r=0.49, p= 0.03) in postmenopausal osteoporotic women.
Purpose/Hypothesis: Physical therapists require accurate energy expenditure measures to develop safe, effective exercise and weight management protocols.
As we all know, a stable body weight results from being in energy balance: energy intake must match energy expenditure. Overeating leads to an increase in fat storage and consequently body weight.
Long-term increases in physical activity energy expenditure were associated with reductions in the risk of death, independent of initial activity levels and changes in diet, weight, and other cardiovascular risk factors.

Full browser ?